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Avon (rivers, England)

Avon (ā´vən, ăv´ən) [Celtic,=river], name of several rivers in England. 1 Also called Bristol Avon or Lower Avon, rising in SW England at Tetbury, Gloucestershire, and flowing 75 mi (121 km) E, S, and then NW through Bath and Bristol to the Severn River at Avonmouth. It is navigable for large vessels to Bristol, an important port. 2 Also called East Avon, rising at Devizes, Wiltshire, S England, and flowing 48 mi (77 km) S past Salisbury to the English Channel at Christchurch. It is navigable for small craft below Salisbury. 3 Also called Upper Avon, the most famous of the Avon rivers, sometimes known as Shakespeare's Avon. It rises near Naseby, Northamptonshire, S central England, and flows 96 mi (154 km) SW to the Severn River near Tewkesbury, passing Rugby, Warwick, and Stratford-upon-Avon.

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"Avon (rivers, England)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Avon (rivers, England)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/avon-rivers-england

Avon

Avon was a new county, formed under the Local Government Act of 1972. It was based upon Bristol, Bath, and Weston-super-Mare, but incorporated a slice of Gloucestershire, including Sodbury, Thornbury, and Marshfield, and a part of north Somerset, including Clevedon, Chew Magna, Radstock, Midsomer Norton, and Steep Holme. The name was taken from the river Avon, which runs through Bath and Bristol. There was considerable opposition to the proposal, particularly from Somerset. The county town was Bristol. Avon was abolished in 1996.

J. A. Cannon

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"Avon." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Avon." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/avon

"Avon." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/avon

Avon

Avon Name of four British rivers. The Bristol (Lower) Avon rises in the Cotswold Hills in Gloucestershire and flows s and then w through Bristol, entering the Severn estuary at Avonmouth. Length: 121km (75mi). The Warwickshire (Upper) Avon rises in Northamptonshire, and flows sw through Stratford-on-Avon to join the River Severn at Tewkesbury. Length: 155km (96mi). The Wiltshire (East) Avon rises near Devizes and flows s into the English Channel. Length: 77km (48mi). The Scottish Avon flows e into the Firth of Forth. Length: 29km (18mi).

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"Avon." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Avon." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/avon-0

"Avon." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/avon-0