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pythoness

pythoness female soothsayer, witch. XIV. ME. phitones(se) — OF. phitonise (mod. pythonisse) — medL. phītōnissa, for late L. pȳthōnissa (Vulg., 1 Chron. 10: 13), fem. of pȳthō (Deut. 18: 11) — late Gr. pū́thōn (Acts 16: 16), identical with pū́thōn PYTHON; assim. to the L. form; see -ESS1.

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"pythoness." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pythoness." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pythoness-0

"pythoness." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pythoness-0

pythoness

pythoness a female soothsayer or conjuror of spirits. Recorded from Middle English, the term comes via Old French from late Latin pythonissa, based on Greek puthōn ‘soothsaying’.

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"pythoness." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pythoness." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pythoness

"pythoness." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pythoness