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Amoraim

Amoraim (ä´mōrä´Ĭm) [Heb. amar=to interpret], in Judaism, term referring to those scholars, predominantly at Caesarea and Tiberias in Palestine (c.AD 220–c.AD 375) and in Babylonia (c.AD 200–c.AD 500), who interpreted the Mishna and other Tannaitic collections (see Talmud). Serving as judges, communal administrators, teachers, and collectors of charity, they were responsive to contemporary problems. Working to supersede the Temple cult, they helped establish the ideal that all Jews should devote themselves to study of the Torah. Their discussions constitute the section of the Talmud known as the Gemara. In addition, they were responsible for much of the nonlegal or aggadic material that appears in the Talmud and in the Midrashim (see Midrash).

See J. Neusner, There We Sat Down (1972); H. L. Strack, Introduction to the Talmud and Midrash (1931, rev. ed. 1991).

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Amoraim

Amoraim (Aramaic, ‘spokesmen’). Jewish scholars who interpreted the Mishnah in Palestine and Babylonia between 200 CE and 500 CE. Those scholars ordained by the nasi and the Sanhedrin in Palestine were given the title ‘Rabbi’ whereas the Babylonian scholars were known as ‘Rav’.

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"Amoraim." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/amoraim

Savoraim

Savoraim (Aram., ‘explainers’). Jewish Babylonian scholars between the time of the amoraim and the geonim. Traditionally the era of the amoraim ends in 499 CE, and the era of the Savoraim ends either in 540 CE or, according to Abraham ibn Daud, in 689 CE.

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"Savoraim." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved October 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/savoraim