Skip to main content

clergy

clergy Collective organization of ordained or consecrated priests and ministers, especially of the Christian Church. In the Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Anglican Churches, the clergy comprise the orders of bishop, priest and deacon, and may also include members of religious orders. In these churches, bishops exercise authority over priests and deacons. In non-episcopal Protestant Churches, the clergy consist of pastors and ministers. Functions of the clergy include administration of the sacrament, preaching and the exercise of spiritual guidance. See also ordination of women

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"clergy." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"clergy." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/clergy

"clergy." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved April 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/clergy

clergy

clergy the body of all people ordained for religious duties, especially in the Christian Church. Recorded from Middle English, the word comes via Old French, based on ecclesiastical Latin clericus ‘clergyman’, from Greek klērikos ‘belonging to the Christian clergy’, from klēros ‘lot, heritage’ (Acts 1:26, ‘And they gave forth their lots, and the lot fell upon Matthias’, in the account of the choosing of a twelfth apostle to replace Judas).

See also benefit of clergy.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"clergy." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"clergy." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy

"clergy." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved April 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy

clergy

clergy A generic term used for ordained religious leaders, deriving from ‘clericus’, a clerk in Holy Orders (bishop, priest, or deacon). In the Christian tradition, ordination creates a status, but not necessarily a role or occupation. However, in recent times it has become professional, though showing discrepancy between (high) prestige and (low) income, compared to other occupations.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"clergy." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"clergy." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy

"clergy." A Dictionary of Sociology. . Retrieved April 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy

Clergy

Clergy (Gk. kleros, an object used in casting lots, as by Jewish priests, Deuteronomy 18. 1 ff.). Designated religious leaders, especially in Christianity by means of ordination. The term ‘clergy’ is sometimes used of functionaries in other religions (e.g. mullahs in Islam), but none have anything like the same order or succession or duties.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Clergy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Clergy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy

"Clergy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved April 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy

clergy

clergy
A. .body of ordained men in the Church;

B. .learning (survived in legal phr. benefit of clergy). XIII. repr. two F. words, (O)F. clergé :- ecclL. clēricātus, f. clēricus (see CLERK, -ATE 1), and (O)F. clergie, f. clerc CLERK + -ie -Y 3.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"clergy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"clergy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy-2

"clergy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved April 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy-2

clergy

cler·gy / ˈklərjē/ • n. (pl. -gies) [usu. treated as pl.] the body of all people ordained for religious duties, esp. in the Christian Church: all marriages were to be solemnized by the clergy.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"clergy." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"clergy." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy-1

"clergy." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy-1

Clergy

CLERGY

This entry includes three subentries:

PROTESTANT CLERGY ROMAN CATHOLIC CLERGY RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CLERGY

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Clergy." Europe, 1450 to 1789: Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Clergy." Europe, 1450 to 1789: Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/clergy

"Clergy." Europe, 1450 to 1789: Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World. . Retrieved April 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/clergy

clergy

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"clergy." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"clergy." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/clergy

"clergy." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved April 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/clergy

clergy

clergy •haji • algae • Angie •argy-bargy, Panaji •edgy, sedgy, solfeggi, veggie, wedgie •cagey, stagy •mangy, rangy •Fiji, gee-gee, squeegee •Murrumbidgee, ridgy, squidgy •dingy, fringy, mingy, stingy, whingy •cabbagy • prodigy • effigy • villagey •porridgy • strategy • cottagey •dodgy, podgy, splodgy, stodgy •pedagogy •Georgie, orgy •ogee • Fuji •bhaji, budgie, pudgy, sludgy, smudgy •bulgy •bungee, grungy, gungy, scungy, spongy •allergy, analogy, genealogy, hypallage, metallurgy, mineralogy, tetralogy •elegy •antilogy, trilogy •aetiology (US etiology), amphibology, anthology, anthropology, apology, archaeology (US archeology), astrology, biology, campanology, cardiology, chronology, climatology, cosmology, craniology, criminology, dermatology, ecology, embryology, entomology, epidemiology, etymology, geology, gynaecology (US gynecology), haematology (US hematology), hagiology, horology, hydrology, iconology, ideology, immunology, iridology, kidology, meteorology, methodology, musicology, mythology, necrology, neurology, numerology, oncology, ontology, ophthalmology, ornithology, parasitology, pathology, pharmacology, phraseology, phrenology, physiology, psychology, radiology, reflexology, scatology, Scientology, seismology, semiology, sociology, symbology, tautology, technology, terminology, theology, topology, toxicology, urology, zoology • eulogy • energy • synergy • apogee • liturgy • lethargy •burgee, clergy •zymurgy • dramaturgy

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"clergy." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 29 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"clergy." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 29, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy-0

"clergy." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved April 29, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/clergy-0