Skip to main content
Select Source:

simony

simony (sĬm´ənē), in canon law, buying or selling of any spiritual benefit or office. The name is derived from Simon Magus, who tried to buy the gifts of the Holy Spirit from St. Peter (Acts 8). Simony is a very grave sin, and ecclesiastics who commit it may be excommunicated. The temporal price may be one of many kinds, e.g., money or high office. What is sold may be the performance of a sacrament or any other spiritual service; it is also simony to sell a benefice or endowment or other temporality to which anything spiritual is attached. Because of the frequency of simony at times in the history of the Roman Catholic Church, the legislation of the church is very strict; e.g., simony in the election of a pope invalidates the election (law of Julius II, 1503); no priest may ask for a baptismal fee in any way; and Mass stipends are fixed by the bishop and are governed by the expense of the Mass and the necessities of the priest. Since the Council of Trent the sale of indulgences is prohibited in any form, and no blessed article may be sold as blessed. The prevalence of simony was most important in bringing about the 11th-century papal reform movement.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"simony." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"simony." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/simony

"simony." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/simony

simony

si·mo·ny / ˈsīmənē; ˈsi-/ • n. chiefly hist. the buying or selling of ecclesiastical privileges, for example pardons or benefices. DERIVATIVES: si·mo·ni·ac / sīˈmōnēˌak; si-/ adj. & n. si·mo·ni·a·cal / ˌsīməˈnīəkəl; si-/ adj.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"simony." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"simony." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/simony-1

"simony." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/simony-1

simony

simony. Although particularly associated with the purchase of preferment or office in the church, simony is strictly the acquisition by financial means of any spiritual benefit. The name comes from that of Simon Magus, recorded in Acts 8. Consistently denounced by councils of the church throughout the centuries, it has remained a temptation not universally resisted.

Revd Dr John R. Guy

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"simony." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"simony." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/simony

"simony." The Oxford Companion to British History. . Retrieved June 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/simony

simony

simony XIII. — (O)F. simonie — late L. simōnia, f. name of Simon Magus in allusion to his offer of money to the Apostles Peter and John for the gift of conferring the Holy Ghost (Acts 8: 18, 19); see -Y2.
So simoniac XIV (sb.; adj. XVII). — (O)F. simoniaque or medL. simoniacus. simoniacal (-AL1) XVI.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"simony." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"simony." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/simony-2

"simony." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved June 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/simony-2

simony

simony the buying or selling of ecclesiastical privileges, for example pardons or benefices, from the name of Simon Magus, in reference to his attempt to buy the power of the Holy Spirit from Peter and Paul.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"simony." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"simony." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/simony

"simony." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved June 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/simony

Simony

Simony. From the action of Simon Magus in Acts 8. 18–24, the purchase or sale of spiritual things, and specifically of an ecclesiastical benefice or preferment.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Simony." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Simony." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/simony

"Simony." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved June 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/simony

simony

simonyLéonie, peony •Tierney •Briony, bryony, Hermione •tourney • ebony • Albany •chalcedony • Alderney •Persephone, Stephanie, telephony •antiphony, epiphany, polyphony, tiffany •symphony •cacophony, homophony, theophany, Zoffany •euphony • agony • garganey •Antigone •cosmogony, mahogany, theogony •balcony • Gascony • Tuscany •calumny •felony, Melanie, miscellany •villainy • colony •Chamonix, salmony, scammony, Tammany •harmony •anemone, Emeny, hegemony, lemony, Yemeni •alimony, palimony •agrimony • acrimony •matrimony, patrimony •ceremony • parsimony • antimony •sanctimony • testimony • simony •Romany • Germany • threepenny •timpani • sixpenny • tuppenny •accompany, company •barony • saffrony • tyranny •synchrony • irony • saxony • cushiony •Anthony • betony •Brittany, dittany, litany •botany, cottony, monotony •gluttony, muttony •Bethany • oniony • raisiny •attorney, Burney, Czerny, Ernie, ferny, gurney, journey, Verny

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"simony." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"simony." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/simony-0

"simony." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved June 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/simony-0