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Ubiquity

UBIQUITY

Ubiquity refers to the ability of a companyand the products and services it sellsto establish a dominant presence among consumers. Although physical retail locations and traditional marketing initiatives support this end, the Internet and e-commerce do much to champion ubiquity for a company. The Internet makes it possible for consumers and companies to be in constant contact with one another, albeit electronically. Thus, consumers who wish to buy goods and services online can do so at any time, and from virtually any location.

Ubiquity means much more than being open for business around the clock in case consumers wish to do business. More specifically, the term is used to describe the degree to which a company has made inroads with customers in terms of product or service adoption. Microsoft, and the many software products it sells, is one example. The company's Windows operating system, Internet Explorer Web browser, and Microsoft Office suite of productivity software are so pervasive that almost every computer user relies on one of the company's products while engaging in e-commerce.

The disposable cameras sold by Eastman Kodak Co. are another example of ubiquity. By design, the cameras are convenient for consumers to buy and use in just about any location or situation. Capitalizing on this, Kodak rolled out a marketing initiative to sell the cameras and film in locations where consumers are likely to want themincluding amusement parks and scenic locationsvia refrigerated vending machines connected wirelessly to the Internet. Kodak worked with Dixie-Narco, the vending machine unit of appliance maker Maytag Corp., and Pennsylvania-based e-Vend.net to develop the program. E-Vend.net 's Internet-based technology enabled the vending machines' inventories to be monitored remotely and made it possible for the machines to accept credit-card transactions and collect marketing data for Kodak.

In a company statement, Steve Hallowell, Kodak's general manager and vice president of cameras and sponsorships, explained why the initiative supported the ubiquity of its one-time-use cameras. "Pictures are what make people celebrate life's memories, but more than one third of these pictures are missed due to not having a camera on hand," he said. "Through e-Vend.net 's state-of-the-art technology, we are now able to put film and cameras in the hands of consumers right where they're going to take pictures, fulfilling our continuing strategy of growing the market."

In addition to referring to the penetration of a company and its products in the marketplace, the term ubiquity also can apply to the use and meaning of terms. In the e-commerce arena, this has happened with the term "platform." Historically, this word was used to describe operating systems like Microsoft Windows, Macintosh OS, Unix, and Linux. Operating systems are the software applications computers use to function. In the early 2000s software vendors began to describe certain software solutions they offered to companies as platforms. Use of the term thus grew more widespread, and its meaning more common. This was especially true in the case of application servers, which allow software applications within a company to communicate with one another for e-commerce and other purposes, even though they may not have been designed to do so.

FURTHER READING:

Gilbert, Jennifer. "Visa Stamps Name All Over Cyberspace in Bid for Ubiquity." Advertising Age, May 3, 1999.

"Kodak, Maytag and e-Vend.net Ally for Vending Program; Will Put Film, One-Time-Use Cameras at 'Points of Picture' Nationwide." Eastman Kodak Co. January 11, 2001. Available from www.kodak.com.

Lake, David. "From Here to Ubiquity." The Industry Standard, June 11, 2001. Available from www.thestandard.com.

SEE ALSO: Brand Building

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Ubiquity

663. Ubiquity (See also Omnipresence.)

  1. Burma-Shave their signs seen as verses of the wayside throughout America. [Am. Commerce and Folklore: Misc.]
  2. Coca-Cola soft drink found throughout the world. [Trademarks:Crowley Trade, 115]
  3. Gideon Bible bible placed in hotel rooms and other establishments throughout the world. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 291]
  4. Howard Johnsons restaurant-motel chain throughout America; buildings recognized by their bright orange roofs. [Trademarks:Crowley Trade, 274]
  5. Kilroy fictitious American soldier; left inscription, Kilroy was here, everywhere U.S. soldiers were stationed (1940s). [Am. Mil. Folklore: Misc.]
  6. McDonalds fast-food restaurant chain throughout the world; recognized by golden arches. [Am. Culture: Misc.]

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"Ubiquity." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Ubiquity

Ubiquity (Lat., ubique, ‘everywhere’). The claim, in general, that God is present to all events and circumstances, i.e. is omnipresent. In Luther, ubiquity is the presence of Christ to each enactment of the Lord's Supper.

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ubiquity

ubiquitybanditti, bitty, chitty, city, committee, ditty, gritty, intercity, kitty, nitty-gritty, Pitti, pity, pretty, shitty, slitty, smriti, spitty, titty, vittae, witty •fifty, fifty-fifty, nifty, shifty, swiftie, thrifty •guilty, kiltie, silty •flinty, linty, minty, shinty •ballistae, Christie, Corpus Christi, misty, twisty, wristy •sixty •deity, gaiety (US gayety), laity, simultaneity, spontaneity •contemporaneity, corporeity, femineity, heterogeneity, homogeneity •anxiety, contrariety, dubiety, impiety, impropriety, inebriety, notoriety, piety, satiety, sobriety, ubiety, variety •moiety •acuity, ambiguity, annuity, assiduity, congruity, contiguity, continuity, exiguity, fatuity, fortuity, gratuity, ingenuity, perpetuity, perspicuity, promiscuity, suety, superfluity, tenuity, vacuity •rabbity •improbity, probity •acerbity • witchetty • crotchety •heredity •acidity, acridity, aridity, avidity, cupidity, flaccidity, fluidity, frigidity, humidity, hybridity, insipidity, intrepidity, limpidity, liquidity, lividity, lucidity, morbidity, placidity, putridity, quiddity, rabidity, rancidity, rapidity, rigidity, solidity, stolidity, stupidity, tepidity, timidity, torpidity, torridity, turgidity, validity, vapidity •commodity, oddity •immodesty, modesty •crudity, nudity •fecundity, jocundity, moribundity, profundity, rotundity, rubicundity •absurdity • difficulty • gadgety •majesty • fidgety • rackety •pernickety, rickety •biscuity •banality, duality, fatality, finality, ideality, legality, locality, modality, morality, natality, orality, reality, regality, rurality, tonality, totality, venality, vitality, vocality •fidelity •ability, agility, civility, debility, docility, edibility, facility, fertility, flexility, fragility, futility, gentility, hostility, humility, imbecility, infantility, juvenility, liability, mobility, nihility, nobility, nubility, puerility, senility, servility, stability, sterility, tactility, tranquillity (US tranquility), usability, utility, versatility, viability, virility, volatility •ringlety •equality, frivolity, jollity, polity, quality •credulity, garrulity, sedulity •nullity •amity, calamity •extremity • enmity •anonymity, dimity, equanimity, magnanimity, proximity, pseudonymity, pusillanimity, unanimity •comity •conformity, deformity, enormity, multiformity, uniformity •subcommittee • pepperminty •infirmity •Christianity, humanity, inanity, profanity, sanity, urbanity, vanity •amnesty •lenity, obscenity, serenity •indemnity, solemnity •mundanity • amenity •affinity, asininity, clandestinity, divinity, femininity, infinity, masculinity, salinity, trinity, vicinity, virginity •benignity, dignity, malignity •honesty •community, immunity, importunity, impunity, opportunity, unity •confraternity, eternity, fraternity, maternity, modernity, paternity, taciturnity •serendipity, snippety •uppity •angularity, barbarity, bipolarity, charity, circularity, clarity, complementarity, familiarity, granularity, hilarity, insularity, irregularity, jocularity, linearity, parity, particularity, peculiarity, polarity, popularity, regularity, secularity, similarity, singularity, solidarity, subsidiarity, unitarity, vernacularity, vulgarity •alacrity • sacristy •ambidexterity, asperity, austerity, celerity, dexterity, ferrety, posterity, prosperity, severity, sincerity, temerity, verity •celebrity • integrity • rarity •authority, inferiority, juniority, majority, minority, priority, seniority, sonority, sorority, superiority •mediocrity • sovereignty • salubrity •entirety •futurity, immaturity, impurity, maturity, obscurity, purity, security, surety •touristy •audacity, capacity, fugacity, loquacity, mendacity, opacity, perspicacity, pertinacity, pugnacity, rapacity, sagacity, sequacity, tenacity, veracity, vivacity, voracity •laxity •sparsity, varsity •necessity •complexity, perplexity •density, immensity, propensity, tensity •scarcity • obesity •felicity, toxicity •fixity, prolixity •benedicite, nicety •anfractuosity, animosity, atrocity, bellicosity, curiosity, fabulosity, ferocity, generosity, grandiosity, impecuniosity, impetuosity, jocosity, luminosity, monstrosity, nebulosity, pomposity, ponderosity, porosity, preciosity, precocity, reciprocity, religiosity, scrupulosity, sinuosity, sumptuosity, velocity, verbosity, virtuosity, viscosity •paucity • falsity • caducity • russety •adversity, biodiversity, diversity, perversity, university •sacrosanctity, sanctity •chastity •entity, identity •quantity • certainty •cavity, concavity, depravity, gravity •travesty • suavity •brevity, levity, longevity •velvety • naivety •activity, nativity •equity •antiquity, iniquity, obliquity, ubiquity •propinquity

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"ubiquity." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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