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ANAPHORA

ANAPHORA. [Stress ‘a-NA-fo-ra’]. Also anaphoric reference.
1. A term in GRAMMAR and LINGUISTICS for referring back in a stretch of language, as with it in: ‘Although the aircraft had been damaged, it could still fly.’ Here, the pronoun it substitutes for its antecedent the aircraft. In the next example, the definite article the in the conference is anaphoric, referring back to a conference: ‘The EC leaders agreed to hold a conference on economic and monetary union, and have now fixed a date for the conference.’ Anaphoric reference may be achieved through ellipsis, as in ‘We asked them to join us, but they wouldn't’, where they wouldn't means they wouldn't join us. The term is sometimes extended to include CATAPHORA (forward reference to a following part of the text).

2. Also epanaphora. A term in rhetoric for the repetition of the same word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases, clauses, sentences, and stanzas: ‘He shows us a country where a man can be denied the right to know of what and by whom he is accused. A country where some police shoot first and ask questions later’ (Christian Science Monitor, international edition, 11 Apr. 1988). Compare ANADIPLOSIS.

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"ANAPHORA." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"ANAPHORA." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/anaphora-0

"ANAPHORA." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/anaphora-0

anaphora

a·naph·o·ra / əˈnafərə/ • n. 1. Gram. the use of a word referring to or replacing a word used earlier in a sentence, to avoid repetition, such as do in I like it and so do they. 2. Rhetoric the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses. DERIVATIVES: an·a·phor·ic / ˌanəˈfôrik/ adj.

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"anaphora." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"anaphora." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaphora

"anaphora." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaphora

Anaphora

Anaphora (Gk., ‘offering’). The central part of the Christian eucharist, known in the West as the canon), and in the East as the Eucharistic Prayer. The W. Syrian Annaphuras are variant liturgies which are claimed to go back to early days.

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"Anaphora." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Anaphora." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaphora

"Anaphora." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaphora

anaphora

anaphora (rhet.) repetition XVI; (liturg.) Eucharistic canon XVIII. — L. — Gr. anaphorā́ carrying back, f. anaphérein carry up or back, f. aná ANA- + phérein BEAR2.

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"anaphora." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"anaphora." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaphora-0

"anaphora." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 14, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/anaphora-0