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Job

Job (jōb), book of the Bible. The book is of unknown authorship and date, although many scholars assign it to a time between 600 BC and 400 BC A lament in narrative form, the subject is the problem of good and evil in the world: "Why do the just suffer and the wicked flourish?" In the prose prologue Satan obtains God's permission to test the unsuspecting Job, whom God regards as "a perfect and an upright man" ; accordingly, all that Job has is destroyed, and he is physically afflicted. The main part of the book is cast in poetic form and consists of speeches by Job and three friends who come to "comfort" him: Job speaks, then each of the three speaks in turn, with Job replying each time; there are three such cycles of discussion, although the third is incomplete. The friends insist alike that Job cannot really be just, as he claims to be, otherwise he would not be suffering as he is. Nevertheless, Job reiterates his innocence of wrong. The sequence changes with the appearance of a fourth speaker, Elihu, who accuses Job of arrogant pride. He in turn is followed by God himself, who speaks out of a storm to convince Job of his ignorance and rebuke him for his questioning. The prose epilogue tells how God rebukes the three friends for their accusations and how happiness is restored to Job. The author did not intend to solve the paradox of the righteous person's suffering, but rather to criticize a philosophy that located the cause of suffering in some supposed moral failure of the sufferer. The texts are certainly imperfect, and there may be serious losses, corruptions, misplacements, or even additions to the original. Some scholars think that the outer prose sections may have been written separately from the passionate verse of the inner section. The book contains many eloquent passages; among them are Job's declaration of faith in the "redeemer," his speech on wisdom, and God's discourse on animals. Job is mentioned elsewhere in the Bible.

See N. C. Habel, Job (1985); L. G. Perdue and W. C. Gilpin, ed., The Voice from the Whirlwind: Interpreting the Book of Job (1991); R. P. Scheindlin, The Book of Job (1998); R. Alter, The Wisdom Books (2010); M. Larrimore, The Book of Job (2013). See also bibliography under Old Testament.

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"Job." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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job

job1 / jäb/ • n. 1. a paid position of regular employment: jobs are created in the private sector, not in Washington a part-time job. 2. a task or piece of work, esp. one that is paid: she wants to be left alone to get on with the job you did a good job of explaining. ∎  a responsibility or duty: it's our job to find things out. ∎  [in sing.] inf. a difficult task: we thought you'd have a job getting there. ∎  inf. a procedure to improve the appearance of something, esp. an operation involving plastic surgery: she's had a nose job someone had done a skillful paint job. ∎  inf. a thing of a specified nature: the car was a blue malevolent-looking job. ∎ inf. a crime, esp. a robbery: a series of daring bank jobs. ∎  Comput. an operation or group of operations treated as a single and distinct unit. • v. (jobbed, job·bing ) 1. [intr.] [usu. as adj.] (jobbing) do casual or occasional work: a jobbing builder. 2. [tr.] buy and sell (stocks) as a broker-dealer, esp. on a small scale. 3. [tr.] inf. cheat; betray. 4. [intr.] archaic turn a public office or a position of trust to private advantage. PHRASES: do the job inf. achieve the required result: a piece of board will do the job.do a job on someone inf. do something that harms or defeats an opponent: I go out and do a job on anyone who is giving our top scorers a hard time.a good job inf., chiefly Brit. a fortunate fact or circumstance: it was a good job she hadn't brought the car.on the job while working; at work.out of a job unemployed.job2 archaic • v. (jobbed, job·bing ) [tr.] prod or stab: he prepared to job the huge brute. ∎  thrust (something pointed) at or into something. • n. an act of prodding, thrusting, or wrenching.

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"job." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Job

Job in the Bible, a prosperous man whose patience and piety were tried by undeserved misfortunes, and who, in spite of his bitter lamentations, remained confident in the goodness and justice of God; also, the book of the Bible recounting his story.

Job is shown initially as a man who is wealthy and upright, surrounded by his family; he is reduced from this to sitting among ashes scraping with potsherds at the boils that afflict him, while his wife urges him to ‘Curse God, and die.’ Despite this, and despite the comforting of his friends which only aggravates his sense of despair, he remains true to his belief in God, and is in the end restored and justified.
Job's comforter a person who aggravates distress under the guise of giving comfort, with allusion to the story of the biblical patriarch, in which three friends who came to comfort him only increased his sense of injustice and wrong.
poor as Job very poor. Job after his possessions are taken from him becomes a type of abject poverty; proverbial allusions to him are recorded from late Middle English.

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Job, Book of

Job, Book of. One of the books of Writings (Ketuvim) in the Hebrew scriptures. It describes how the righteous Job was deprived by God of all his possessions including his children and was struck down with a vile disease (1–2). His three friends try to comfort him (3–26), but Job will not accept that he has sinned against the Lord (rightly, since he has been defined as innocent for the purpose of the book). Job laments his disastrous fate (29–31) and a fourth friend attempts consolation (32–7). Ultimately God speaks to Job (38–48) and all his fortune is restored.

In Islam Job is known as Ayyūb. Qurʾān 21. 83–4 and 38. 41–4 refer briefly to his calamities, his patience, and his restoration to prosperity.

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"Job, Book of." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Job, Book of." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/job-book

Job

Job

Job is the name of a book in the Hebrew Bible and the name of the book's main character. Many scholars consider the Book of Job to be one of the finest works of literature ever written. It focuses on the question of why the innocent suffer.

Job, a wealthy man, blessed with a loving wife and family, is known for his goodness and devotion to the will of Yahweh, the Hebrew god. The Bible indicates that Job's prosperity and general good fortune are a reward for his goodness and belief in Yahweh. However, in a meeting between Yahweh and his heavenly advisers, Satan questions Job's faith, claiming that he is faithful because of the many blessings he enjoys. If Job were to suffer misfortune, suggests Satan, he would curse Yahweh as readily as he now praises him. Satan challenges Yahweh to test Job's faith, and Yahweh accepts the challenge.

Yahweh inflicts a number of terrible misfortunes on Job. He kills Job's children and causes him to lose all his wealth, but Job's belief in the goodness of Yahweh remains unshaken. This show of faith does not convince Satan, however, who says that physical pain and suffering would cause Job to abandon his belief. So Yahweh causes Job to be afflicted with painful boils all over his body, and still his faith remains firm.

* See Names and Places at the end of this volume for further information.

At this point three friends visit Job, supposedly to comfort him by explaining why Yahweh is causing him to suffer. They suggest that Job must be guilty of some sin, because Yahweh only punishes the wicked. Knowing that he is a righteous man, Job refuses to accept their arguments. Finally Job pleads with Yahweh to end his suffering and asks him to explain why he is tormenting a good man. Yahweh appears to Job in all his glory, overwhelming him with his magnificence. He proceeds to question Job about the mysteries of the universe. When Job cannot answer, Yahweh asks him how he could possibly hope to understand the will of the almighty if he cannot explain the workings of nature. Job accepts this answer and renews his faith in Yahweh, who rewards him by restoring his health and prosperity.

In the end, Yahweh offers no answer to the question of why the innocent must suffer. Instead, the Book of Job delivers the message that one must believe in the goodness of Yahweh, even in the face of seemingly unjust punishment.

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job

job A set of programs and the data to be manipulated by these programs. The word also means the execution of the set of programs. In its simplest form a job may consist of loading a binary program and then executing this program using supplied data. In more complex forms whole series of steps may be taken, certain of which may be contingent on the outcome of earlier steps. The complete description of a job is written in a job-control language.

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"job." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Job

Job.
1. Masque for dancing in 9 scenes and epilogue by Vaughan Williams, founded on Blake's Illustrations of the Book of Job. Comp. 1927–30. F.p. (concert) Norwich 1930, (ballet) London 1931.

2. Oratorio by Parry, f.p. Gloucester 1892.

3. Opera (sacra rappresentazione) in 1 act by Dallapiccola, text by composer from Book of Job, comp. 1950, f.p. Rome 1950.

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"Job." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Job

Job / jōb/ (in the Bible) a prosperous man whose patience and piety were tried by undeserved misfortunes, and who, in spite of his bitter lamentations, remained confident in the goodness and justice of God. ∎  a book of the Bible telling of Job.

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job

job2 piece of work XVI; transaction, operation XVII; position of employment XIX (orig. U.S. colloq.). poss. transf. use of †job piece, lump (XIV), cart-load (XVI), of unkn. orig.

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"job." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Job

Job Old Testament book describing the crises in the life of Job, a well-to-do man from a town e of Palestine. The main theme is that suffering comes to good and bad people alike.

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Job

Job patriarch of the O.T. taken as a type of destitution and of patience. XVI.

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job

job1 pierce to a slight depth as with a pointed object. XV. of symbolic orig.; cf BOB2. STAB(†stob), JAB, DAB1.

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job

jobblob, bob, cob, dob, fob, glob, gob, hob, job, knob, lob, mob, nob, rob, slob, snob, sob, squab, stob, swab, throb, yob •nabob • skibob • thingamabob •corncob • hobnob • doorknob •heartthrob

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