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tabernacle

tab·er·nac·le / ˈtabərˌnakəl/ • n. 1. (in biblical use) a fixed or movable habitation, typically of light construction. ∎  a tent used as a sanctuary for the Ark of the Covenant by the Israelites during the Exodus and until the building of the Temple. 2. a meeting place for worship used by some Protestants or Mormons. 3. an ornamented receptacle or cabinet in which a pyx or ciborium containing the reserved sacrament may be placed in Catholic churches, usually on or above an altar. ∎ archaic a canopied niche or recess in the wall of a church. 4. a partly open socket or double post on a sailboat's deck into which a mast is fixed, with a pivot near the top so that the mast can be lowered. DERIVATIVES: tab·er·nac·led adj. ORIGIN: Middle English: via French from Latin tabernaculum ‘tent,’ diminutive of taberna ‘hut, tavern.’

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"tabernacle." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Tabernacle

Tabernacle Portable shrine used by the Hebrews for worship during their wanderings in Sinai. It was a rectangular tent covered with a curtain of goat's hair and a layer of animal skins and roofed with a ceiling of linen tapestry. Inside the Tabernacle, the space divided into two rooms: the outer room was the Holy Place, and the inner was the Holy of Holies, where God was believed to be present. The Holy of Holies contained the Ark of the Covenant, above which was a slab of gold believed to be the throne of God. After the Hebrews settled Canaan, there was no further need for the Tabernacle. Eventually its relics transferred to the Temple built by Solomon in Jerusalem. In the Christian Church, a tabernacle is a receptacle in which the Blessed Sacrament is reserved for the Eucharist, or a recess used for spiritual contemplation.

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"Tabernacle." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Tabernacle

Tabernacle (tăb´ərnăk´əl), in the Bible, the portable holy place of the Hebrews during their desert wanderings. It was a tent, like the portable tent-shrines used by ancient Semites, set up in each camp; eventually it housed the Ark of the Covenant (see ark, 2). In the Book of Numbers, the Tabernacle is referred to as the "Tent of Meeting" when it functioned as the place for divine revelation to Moses. The Tabernacle rested in Shiloh before it was finally placed in Jerusalem. David kept the Ark of the Covenant inside it. During Solomon's reign, the Tabernacle was replaced by the Temple as a sign that God had given his people rest from their wandering. The term is also applied to the small receptacle, used in the Roman Catholic Church, in which the Host in the ciborium is reserved on the altar.

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"Tabernacle." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tabernacle

tabernacle in biblical use, a fixed or movable habitation, typically of light construction; a tent used as a sanctuary for the Ark of the Covenant by the Israelites during the Exodus and until the building of the Temple. The word is recorded from Middle English, and comes via French from Latin tabernaculum ‘tent’, diminutive of taberna ‘hut, tavern’.

From the late 15th century, the term has also been used to denote an ornamented receptacle or cabinet in which a pyx containing the reserved sacrament may be placed in Catholic churches, usually on or above an altar.
Feast of Tabernacles another name for succoth.

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"tabernacle." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"tabernacle." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tabernacle

Tabernacle

Tabernacle (Heb., mishkan). The portable sanctuary constructed by the Hebrew people in the wilderness. Exodus 25–31 and 35–40 describe the construction of the tabernacle, and Numbers 3. 25 ff. and 4. 4 ff. discuss its furnishings and the duties of the Levites (see LEVI).

In Christianity the word was originally applied to a variety of canopied structures in a church building, but most usually refers to an ornamental receptacle or cupboard for the reserved sacrament.

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"Tabernacle." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tabernacle

tabernacle.
1. Portable shrine, originally a curtained tent, containing the Jewish Ark of the Covenant.

2. Cupboard with doors containing the consecrated Host on an altar.

3. Pyx.

4. Any canopied niche containing an image.

5. Shrine or canopied tomb.

6. Baldacchino or ciborium.

7. Place of worship distinguished from a church, e.g. meeting-house, especially one with no architectural pretensions, for Nonconformist Protestants.

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"tabernacle." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tabernacle

tabernacle tent containing the Ark of the Covenant; canopied structure XIII; tent (gen.), dwelling-place (esp. temporary) XIV; place of worship (not a church) XVII. — (O)F. tabernacle or L. tabernāculum tent, booth, dim. of taberna TAVERN.

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"tabernacle." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"tabernacle." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tabernacle-2

Tabernacle

Tabernacle

of bakers: a company of bakersBk. of St. Albans, 1486.

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"Tabernacle." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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tabernacle

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