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dust

dust / dəst/ • n. 1. fine, dry powder consisting of tiny particles of earth or waste matter lying on the ground or on surfaces or carried in the air: the car sent up clouds of dust they rolled and fought in the dust. ∎  any material in the form of tiny particles: coal dust. ∎  [in sing.] a fine powder: he ground it into a fine dust. ∎  [in sing.] a cloud of dust. ∎ poetic/lit. a dead person's remains: scatter my dust and ashes. ∎ poetic/lit. the mortal human body: the soul, that dwells within your dust. 2. [in sing.] an act of dusting: a quick dust, to get rid of the cobwebs. • v. [tr.] 1. remove the dust from the surface of (something) by wiping or brushing it: I broke the vase I had been dusting pick yourself up and dust yourself off | [intr.] she washed and dusted and tidied. ∎  (dust something off) bring something out for use again after a long period of neglect: a number of aircraft will be dusted off and returned to flight. ∎  Baseball (dust someone off) deliver a pitch very near a batter so they must fall to the dirt to avoid being hit by it. 2. (usu. be dusted) cover lightly with a powdered substance: roll out on a surface dusted with flour. ∎  sprinkle (a powdered substance) onto something: orange powder was dusted over the upper body. 3. inf. beat up or kill someone: the officers dusted him up a little bit. PHRASES: dust and ashes used to convey a feeling of great disappointment or disillusion about something: the party would be dust and ashes if he couldn't come. the dust settles things quiet down: she hoped that the dust would settle quickly and the episode be forgotten. eat someone's dust inf. fall far behind someone in a competitive situation. gather (or collect) dust remain unused: some professors let their computers gather dust. leave someone/something in the dust surpass someone or something easily: today's modems leave their predecessors in the dust.DERIVATIVES: dust·less adj.

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"dust." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"dust." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dust-1

"dust." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dust-1

dust

dust sb. OE. dūst = MDu. donst, dūst (LG. dust, Du. duist meal-dust, bran), ON. dust. The primary notion seems to be ‘that which rises in a cloud’; cf. OHG. tun(i)st wind, breeze, G. dunst vapour.
Hence dust vb. †rise as dust XIII; †reduce to dust XV; soil with dust; free from dust XVI (whence duster XVI). dusty OE. dūstiġ.

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"dust." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"dust." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dust-2

"dust." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dust-2

dust

dust dust and ashes used to convey a feeling of great disappointment of disillusion about something; originally with allusion to the legend of the Dead Sea fruit.
shake the dust off one's feet depart indignantly or disdainfully; originally with allusion to Matthew 10:14.

See also ashes to ashes, dust to dust, a peck of dust in March.

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"dust." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"dust." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dust

"dust." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dust

dust

dust Solid particles, the size of clay and silt particles (see PARTICLE SIZE), that can be raised and carried by the wind.

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"dust." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"dust." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dust

"dust." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dust

dust

dustadjust, august, bust, combust, crust, dust, encrust, entrust, gust, just, lust, mistrust, must, robust, rust, thrust, trust, undiscussed •stardust • sawdust • angel dust •bloodlust • wanderlust • upthrust

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"dust." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"dust." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dust-0

"dust." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/dust-0