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Ops

Ops (ŏps), in Roman religion, goddess of harvests. She was the wife of Saturn, by whom she bore Jupiter and Juno. At her festivals, the Opiconsivia and the Opalia, held in August and December, respectively, she was worshiped as a goddess of sowing and reaping and was associated with Consus, god of crops. She was later identified with the Greek Rhea.

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"Ops." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Ops." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/ops

"Ops." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved April 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/ops

Ops

Ops in Roman mythology, goddess of abundance and harvest, associated with Saturn. She is referred to in Paradise Lost as Saturn's consort, and in Keats's Hyperion as one of the fallen Titans.

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"Ops." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 27 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Ops." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 27, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/ops

"Ops." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved April 27, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/ops