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Roman gods of mythology

Roman gods of mythology

Apollo: God of the Sun

Aurora: Goddess of the dawn

Bacchus: God of wine

Bellona: Goddess of war

Ceres: Goddess of agriculture

Cupid: God of love

Diana: Goddess of fertility, hunting, and the Moon

Faunus: God of prophecy

Flora: Goddess of flowers

Janus: God of gates and doors

Juno: Goddess of marriage and women

Jupiter: Supreme god and god of the sky

Lares: Gods of the household and descendants

Libitina: Goddess of funerals

Maia: Goddess of growth and increase

Mars: God of war

Mercury: Messenger god; god of commerce

Minerva: Goddess of wisdom, the arts, and trades

Mithras: God of the Sun, light and regeneration

Neptune: God of the sea

Ops: Goddess of fertility

Pales: Goddess of flocks and shepherds

Pluto: God of the Underworld

Pomona: Goddess of fruit trees and fruit

Proserpine: Goddess of the Underworld

Saturn: God of seed time and harvest

Venus: Goddess of beauty and love

Vertumnus: God of the seasons

Vesta: Goddess of the hearth

Vulcan: God of fire


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Juno (in Roman religion and mythology)

Juno, in Roman religion and mythology, wife and sister of Jupiter. In early Roman times she, like the Greek Hera (with whom she was later identified), was goddess and protector of women, concerned especially with their sexual life. In later religion she became, however, the great goddess of the state and was worshiped, in conjunction with Jupiter and Minerva, at the temple on the Capitol.

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"Juno (in Roman religion and mythology)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved April 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/juno-roman-religion-and-mythology

Juno

Juno In Roman mythology, the principal female deity and consort of Jupiter, depicted as a statuesque, matronly figure.

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