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Wien, Wilhelm

Wilhelm Wien (vĬl´hĕlm vēn), 1864–1928, German physicist. He was professor at the universities of Giessen (1899), Würzburg (1900–1920), and Munich (from 1920). He received the 1911 Nobel Prize in Physics for his studies on the radiation of heat from black objects. He is noted also for his work on hydrodynamics, X rays, and the radiation of light.

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Wiens displacement law

Wien's displacement law The law which states that the wavelength of electromagnetic radiation emitted by a material is inversely proportional to the absolute temperature of that material. As the absolute temperature increases, the wavelength of emitted radiation becomes shorter.

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"Wiens displacement law." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Wiens displacement law." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved August 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/wiens-displacement-law