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Belly

Belly

Rock band

For the Record

Joining Forces

Donelly in Front

Continued Acclaim for Sophomore Effort

Selected discography

Sources

Eric Boehlert, writing in Billboard, described the phenomenally successful sound of Belly as fuzzy guitars, big bouncy hooks, cryptic narratives, and alluring vocals. The quartetcomposed of two women and two brotherscomes with an impressive alternative music resume that belies the breezy, almost poplike accessibility of their work. Leader Tanya Donel-ly cut her musical teeth in the much-lauded Throwing Muses of the 1980s; bassist Gail Greenwood is a veteran of two bands; and brothers Chris and Tom Gorman, respectively drummer and guitarist for Belly, served time in Verbal Assault.

With the release of Bellys debut album, Star, in early 1993, the band was virtually an overnight success; the record sold well beyond expectations and earned the reluctant alternative superstars two Grammy award nominations. Named with one of Donellys favorite words, Belly takes some of its melodic cues from the weavy, dreamlike sounds of the Musesbut fuses that with a finely tuned standard pop-song construction. Such a blend of alternative ethos with Top 40 suitability set the

For the Record

Members include Fred Abong (left group, 1993; replaced by Gail Greenwood [born c. 1960]), bass and vocals; Tanya Donelly (born c. 1967), guitar and vocals; Christopher Gorman (worked earlier as a television production assistant), drums and percussion; and Thomas Gorman (studied architecture at Carnegie Mellon University), guitar and piano.

Donelly formed Throwing Muses with stepsister Kristin Hersh, 1981; also a founding member of the Breeders; left Throwing Muses, 1991, and formed Belly with Chris and Tom Gorman and Fred Abong; Greenwood joined Belly in 1993 after stints in the Dames and Boneyard.

Selected Awards: Grammy nominations for best new artist and best alternative album of 1993 for Star.

Addresses: Record company Sire Records, 75 Rockefeller Plaza, 20th Floor, New York, NY 10019-6989.

group at the forefront of a nineties-era trend that promised mainstream success for other, similarly contemporary-sounding alternative acts.

More than anything else, the folks in Belly resemble hip graduate students, remarked Rolling Stone writer Jancee Dunn after interviewing them. Theyre well spoken, well read, funny. They are mindful of the truth (and consequences) of fame and dismissive of the myth of celebrity. Donelly grew up in Newport, Rhode Island, in a liberal household united when her father married the mother of a young girl her own age. Close friends before the marriage, Donelly and stepsister Kristin Hersh grew up in a free-spirited family that encouraged creativity. By the time they were teenagers, they had taught themselves how to play guitar and were writing songs in their room. In 1981, still high-schoolers, they formed Throwing Muses and by the time they graduated were local celebrities on Newports burgeoning alternative music scene.

Joining Forces

Throwing Muses was signed to 4AD when Donelly was nineteen, and the act went on to earn a place in the indie rock hall of fame, putting out several critically acclaimedif commercially unsuccessfulalbums and paving the way for later female-fronted bands. Yet the muse behind the Muses was really Hershs own personal demons, and hence the artistic territory belonged to her alone; other members contributed only nominally to the bands output.

Eventually Donelly began to seek another outlet for her own creative impulses. She found one in 1990 when she became a founding member of the Breeders with Kim Deal of the Pixies she left Throwing Muses for good in 1991. Fortuitously, two brothers she had known in Newport, Chris and Tom Gorman, contacted Donelly soon after and asked if she was interested in working with them. The trio recruited Muses bass player Fred Abong and went into the studio to record their debut album, 1993s Star.

Launched with the single Feed the Tree, Star was an immediate hit on the college charts, then broke through to a more mainstream pop-alternative audience on the so-called modern rock radio format. Bellys debut sold 450,000 copies in just under two years, rose to Number 59 on the Billboard 200, became the longest-ranking Number One album on the Gavin Reports alternative chartsand established Donellys own creative credentials.

Donelly in Front

Donelly sings like someone whos been around the block on more than one supporting tourtelling her tales with the savvy and sensuality of a world-weary ingenue, noted Chris Mundy in Rolling Stone. In a later review of Star, Kevin Ransom declared that Bellys leader and her cohorts render a haunting, avant-folk-rock sound that provides sonic and psychic space for Donellys surreal meditations on birth, mortality and sexuality. And Jas Obrecht, writing for Guitar Player, asserted that among a galaxy of early-90s alternative releases, few shone brighter than Star. Haunting avant folk-rock, Bellys debut set longevity records on college charts and established Donelly as a brilliant, albeit quirky, songwriter.

Indeed, much was made about Donellys ability to shine as frontperson on her own, and critics often saw a thread of resemblance in Bellys quirky lyrical style with the unconventionalities of her former band. As she wrestles with truths that can sometimes transcend language, Donelly favors oblique images and phonetic intrigue over narrative, noted Ransom, while Village Voice contributor Gina Arnold observed, Donellys adept at marshalling the most fragmentary emotion into an entire song. References to dreams, Shakespeare, folklore, and other founts of inner wisdom crop up frequently in Bellys lyrics. I try not to be purposefully obscure. But whatever comes out, I tend to trust that it means something, Donelly told Boehlert. She noted in a talk with Interviews Nils Bernstein that songwriting is a constant companion for her. Snippets come at inconvenient timesin the middle of a conversation, at the bank, at tollboothswhenever Im in danger of losing a song forever. Words pick on me; they think its funny, she said.

Continued Acclaim for Sophomore Effort

After being nominated for two Grammy awardsbest alternative album and best new artist of 1993Belly toured extensively in support of their debut, playing nearly 200 shows in 15 different countries. They also contributed a cover of Are You Experienced?one of the more well-received tracksto a 1993 Jimi Hendrix tribute album. When the time came to record their sophomore effort in early 1994, Bellys alternative star status helped them land assistance from eminent producer Glyn Johns, who had albums by the Rolling Stones and the Who on his production resume. The group headed down to the Compass Point Studios in the Bahamas to record it. Though it seems really glamorous to record on a tropical island, Nassau is actually kind of boring, which helps you focus on your work, Donelly said of the experience in a press release.

The result of that focus was King, released early in 1995 with the first single Now Theyll Sleep. Overall, the record exhibits a harder, less pop-kindled side to Belly. The album is tighter, leaner, more aggressive than Star, observed Dunn in Rolling Stone. King has a timeless, complete feel to it, each song flowing smoothly into the next. Obrecht averred, Folk-rock anxiety, 60s pop sparkle, and garage-band raucousness reign supreme on King, and, like Bellys first effort, the release is awash with topsy-turvy lullabies, midnight confessions, strange, sweet harmonies, and exhilarating guitar tones.

Praise came easily for Donellys voice, a crystalline soprano alternately conveying vulnerability and determination, remarked Parke Puterbaugh in Stereo Review. Jen Fleissner, writing for Spin, declared King a remarkable record. When Donelly turns the lights down low for a ballad or two, she evokes Led Zeppelin or, at the very least, Kate Bush, back when she sang about bank robbers and magicians assistants.

Reporters have often remarked on the camaraderie and lack of self-absorbed star quality evident during encounters with Belly. The brothers Gorman provide balance to the dynamic personalities of Donelly and Green-wood, who likes to compare her bass-playing style to that of 80s rocker Billy Squier. Drummer Chris Gorman also moonlights as the graphic artist for the band, putting together the artistic packaging for their first two releases. Tom Gorman attempted to explain the quartets dynamic interview magazine: We dont really all have equal say in all things, but weve figured out what we all do best and have allowed a delegation of roles. For the most part our tastes and goals are similar, so we dont have to vote on things, we just do it. Call it an unconscious democracy.

Belly appears to have real staying power in the music businessa power built on talent, not gimmick. To her credit, Donelly has consistently steered clear of crassly marketing her physical attributes, a ploy for which she certainly has the looks, remarked Gina Arnold in the Village Voice. Coasting toward mainstream success through alternative musicafter spending many years on its fringeshas given Donelly a unique perspective, as she explained to Boehlert in Billboard. It bothers me when bands will say, As soon as this starts to feel like a job, Im outta here, man. Its like what are you talking about? It is a job. Its a great job.

Selected discography

Star, Sire/Reprise, 1993.

(Contributors) Stone Free: A Tribute to Jimi Hendrix, Reprise, 1993.

King, Sire/Reprise, 1995.

Sources

Billboard, December 24, 1994; March 11, 1995.

Guitar Player, March 1995.

Interview, April 1995.

Rolling Stone, February 4, 1993; April 15, 1993; April 20, 1995.

Spin, March 1995.

Stereo Review, July 1995.

Village Voice, March 7, 1995; June 6, 1995.

Additional information for this profile was taken from promotional material provided by Sire/Reprise Records.

Carol Brennan

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Belly

BELLY

Formed: 1991, Newport, Rhode Island; Disbanded 1996

Members: Members: Tanya Donelly, vocals and guitar (born Newport, Rhode Island, 14 July 1966); Thomas Gorman, lead guitar (born 20 May 1966); Christopher Toll Gorman, drums (born 29 August 1967); Gail Gorman, bass (born 3 October 1960).

Genre: Rock

Best-selling album since 1990: Star (1993)

Hit songs since 1990: "Gepetto," "Feed the Tree," "Now They'll Sleep"


Tanya Donelly, later the honey-voiced lead singer of alternative rock band Belly, initially performed brief stints with other musical outfits: the art-rock band Throwing Muses and the Breeders, a punk-infused guitar-fuzz band that she founded with Kim Deal. Unhappy because these bands did not perform her own songs, Donelly sought the help of musician brothers Tom and Chris Gorman, and Throwing Muses bassist Fred Abong. Together they formed the band Belly.

Like a belly, the group's music could be softbut it could also be macabre and guttural, with fuzzy, distorted guitars in some songs and waltzy, chiming acoustic guitars in others. With lyrics that were often cryptic and surreal, the band found overnight success in indie and alternative rock circles. Despite their dark tendencies, many of Belly's songs are melodic and usually adhere to the constraints of pop music. Belly's debut album, Star (1993), earned two Grammy Award nominations for Best New Artist and Best Alternative album.

Star was certified gold within a year of its release, thanks largely to Belly's extensive touring schedule and success with college radio, which prompted larger radio stations to play their singles "Gepetto" and "Feed the Tree" (southern slang for "death"), with the latter peaking at number one on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart. Its spunky chorus, "Take your hat off boy when you're talking to me / And be there when I feed the tree," is indeed cryptic but vaguely feminist. It struck a chord with high school and college-age women searching for a no-nonsense female role model in the form of a pop star who chose not to exploit her beauty in exchange for fame.

Belly was a strong part of the alternative rock scene in the mid-1990s. In 1993 Gail Greenwood joined the band on bass and performed more than 200 dates in just a little more than a year with the band. The surprise success of their first album prompted them to ask Glyn Johns to produce their follow-up. Their second album, King (1995), is straightforward and aggressive where Star is languid and dreamy, but it retains the band's signature oblique lyrics, swirling guitars, and surrealism. Despite its more consistent sound and radio-friendly hooks, such as in "Now They'll Sleep" and "Super-Connected," King was greeted with mixed reviews by the press and the fans. King peaked at fifty-seven on the Billboard chart and never reached the sales of Belly's debut.

Donelly left the band in 1996 and started a solo career. By the end of 1996, she released her solo debut album, Sliding and Diving. Greenwood joined the all-female punk rock band L7. Sadly, Belly never fully reached its potential. At the band's peak, their memorable blend of strengthsDonelly's big voice, quirky songs with shifting time signatures, and a strong, determined personashowed that even a group with an unconventional approach could achieve mainstream success.

SELECTIVE DISCOGRAPHY:

Star (Sire/Reprise, 1993); King (Sire/Reprise, 1995).

carrie havranek

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belly

bel·ly / ˈbelē/ • n. (pl. -lies) the human trunk below the ribs, containing the stomach and bowels. ∎  the front of this part of the body: he fell flat on his belly. ∎  the stomach, esp. as representing the body's need for food: they'll fight all the better on empty bellies. ∎  the underside of a bird or other animal. ∎  a cut of pork from the underside between the legs. ∎  a pig's belly as food, esp. as a traded commodity. ∎  the rounded underside of a ship or aircraft. ∎  the top surface of an instrument of the violin family, across which the strings are placed. • v. (-lies, -lied) [intr.] 1. swell; bulge: as she leaned forward her pullover bellied out. 2. (belly up to) inf. move or sit close to (a bar or table): regulars who first bellied up to the bar years before. PHRASES: go belly up inf. go bankrupt.DERIVATIVES: bel·lied adj. [usu. in comb.] fat-bellied men. ORIGIN: Old English belig ‘bag,’ of Germanic origin, from a base meaning ‘swell, be inflated.’

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belly

belly †bag, pod, bellows OE.; †body XIII; abdomen, stomach XIV. OE. beliġ = OHG. balg, ON. belgr, Goth. balgs :- Gmc. *balʒiz bag, sack, f. *balʒ-*belʒ- be inflated, swell; cf. BILLOW, BELLOWS.

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belly

belly. The upper surface of a str. instr., over which the str. are stretched. Also the soundboard of pf.

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belly

belly (bel-i) n.
1. the abdomen or abdominal cavity.

2. the central fleshy portion of a muscle.

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belly

bellybelly, Botticelli, casus belli, Corelli, Delhi, deli, Ellie, Grappelli, jelly, Kelly, lamellae, Machiavelli, Mahaweli, nelly, Schiaparelli, Shelley, shelly, smelly, tagliatelle, telly, Torricelli, vermicelli, welly, Zeffirelli •trebly •assembly, trembly •deadly, Hedley, medley, redly •friendly • freckly •cleanly, eco-friendly, user-friendly •heavenly • fleshly • wetly • directly •Bentley • deathly •Lesley, Leslie, Presley, Wesley •yellow-belly • underbelly •bailey, bailie, capercaillie, Cayley, ceilidh, daily, Daley, Daly, Disraeli, Eilidh, feyly, gaily, Haley, Hayley, Israeli, Rayleigh, scaly, shaly, ukulele •ably • ungainly • maidenly • shapely •stately • saintly • paisley • Ainsley •comradely

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