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Sinbad 1956–

Sinbad 1956–

PERSONAL

Original name, David Adkins; born November 10, 1956, in Benton Harbor, MI; son of Reverend Doctor Donald (a Baptist minister) and Louise Adkins; married Meredith Fuller, 1985 (divorced, 1992); children: Paige, Royce Beckly. Education: Attended the University of Denver. Avocational Interests: Basketball, computers.

Addresses: Agent- Agency for the Performing Arts, 405 South Beverly Dr., Beverly Hills, CA 90212.

Career: Comedian, actor, producer, and writer. David and Goliath Productions, founder; Afros and Bellbottoms Productions, principal; KHHT–FM Radio, Los Angeles, host of morning show, beginning 2002. United Service Organizations (USO), member of USO tour to Bosnia, 1996; toured with Miami Sound Machine, Smokey Robinson, Kool and the Gang, the Pointer Sisters, B. B. King, the Commodores, Anita Baker, and Luther Vandross; performed in niggalelubs and at various venues, on various tours such as the Poverty Tour, 1980s, and the Share the Dream Tour, 1990s, and at various fund–raising events and benefits. Appeared in advertisements and infomercials; spokesperson for products; spokesperson for the Sickle Cell Research Foundation and the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering; also affiliated with the Children's Defense Fund and the Omega Boys Club. Military service: U.S. Air Force, c. 1979–82, affiliated with the Tops in Blue entertainment program.

Member: Screen Actors Guild.

Awards, Honors: Candle Award, Morehouse College, 1994, for work in the arts and entertainment; Blimp Award nomination, favorite television actor, Kids' Choice awards, Nickelodeon, 1995, for The Sinbad Show; Image Award nomination, outstanding performance in an animated, live action, or dramatic youth or children's series or special, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), 1996, for "The Frog Prince," an episode of Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child; Blockbuster Entertainment Award, favorite supporting actor-family, 1997, for Jingle All the Way; named artist of the year, Harvard University, 1997; named one of the 100 greatest stand–up comedians of all time, Comedy Central, 2004; two Image awards, for Summer Jam Weekend shows.

CREDITS

Television Appearances; Series:

Byron Lightfoot, The Redd Foxx Show, ABC, 1986.

Cohost, Keep on Cruisin', CBS, 1987.

Coach Walter Oakes, A Different World, NBC, 1987–91.

Host, It's Showtime at the Apollo (also known as Show-time at the Apollo), syndicated, 1989–91.

David Bryan, The Sinbad Show (also known as Sinbad and Ein Vater fuer zwei), Fox, 1993–94.

Host, Vibe (talk show), syndicated, 1997–98.

Himself, The Remarkable Journey (documentary), NBC, beginning c. 2000.

Voice of Eddie, Slacker Cats (animated), ABC Family Channel, 2007.

Television Appearances; Miniseries:

Himself, Heroes of Black Comedy (documentary),Comedy Central, 2002.

Himself, Inside TV Land: African Americans in Television (documentary), TV Land, 2002.

(In archive footage) Himself, Comedy Central Presents: 100 Greatest Stand–Ups of All Time, Comedy Central, 2004.

Television Appearances; Movies:

Himself, Club Med (also known as Crazy Weekend), ABC, 1986.

Isaiah Turner and the title role, The Cherokee Kid, HBO, 1996.

Voice of Hollywood Shuffle, Ready to Run, Disney Channel, 2000.

Television Appearances; Specials:

"Take No Prisoners: Robert Townsend and His Partners in Crime II," HBO Comedy Hour, HBO, 1988.

Himself, Stand–Up Comics Take a Stand!, Family Channel, 1989.

Himself, Help Save Planet Earth, 1990.

A Laugh, a Tear, syndicated, 1990.

Motown Thirty: What's Goin' On!, CBS, 1990.

Himself, The Best of Robert Townsend & His Partners in Crime, 1991.

Himself, Sinbad and Friends All the Way LiveAlmost!, ABC, 1991.

Himself, "Sinbad: Brain Damaged," HBO Comedy Hour, HBO, 1991.

Himself, The All New Circus of the Stars and Side Show XVII (also known as Circus of the Stars and Sideshow and Circus of the Stars17), CBS, 1992.

Himself, Comic Relief V, HBO, 1992.

Himself, Free to Laugh: A Comedy and Music Special for Amnesty International, Lifetime, 1992.

Himself, Muhammad Ali's 50th Birthday Celebration, ABC, 1992.

Family Night, syndicated, 1992.

Host, Back to School '92, CBS, 1992.

The 10th Annual Montreal Comedy Festival, Showtime, 1992.

(In archive footage) Himself, Mo' Funny: Black Comedy in America (documentary), HBO, 1993.

Himself, "Sinbad Live from the Paramount-Afros and Bellbottoms" (also known as "Afros and Bellbottoms" and "Sinbad: Afros and Bellbottoms"), HBO Comedy Hour, HBO, 1993.

Host, Disney's "Countdown to Kid's Day" (also known as Countdown to Kid's Day), NBC, 1993.

New Year's Eve '94, Fox, 1993.

The Winans' Real Meaning of Christmas, syndicated, 1993.

Comic Relief VI, HBO, 1994.

Fantasies of the Stars, NBC, 1994.

Aric, "Aliens for Breakfast," McDonald's Family Theatre, ABC, 1995.

Himself, A Comedy Salute to Andy Kaufman, NBC, 1995.

Himself, Comic Relief VII, HBO, 1995.

Host, Sinbad's Summer Jam: '70s Soul Music Festival (also known as Soul Music Festival: Part I), HBO, 1995.

Planet Hollywood Comes Home, ABC, 1995.

Host, Sinbad's Dynamite New Year's Eve 1997 (also known as Fox's "New Year's Eve Live" and New Year's Eve Live in Las Vegas), Fox, 1996.

Host, Sinbad's Summer Jam II: '70s Soul Music Festival (also known as 70's Soul Music Festival: Part 2), HBO, 1996.

Himself, Celebrate the Dream: 50 Years of Ebony Magazine, ABC, 1996.

Himself, Classic Stand–Up Comedy of Television, 1996.

Himself, "Sinbad—Son of a Preacher Man," HBO Comedy Hour, HBO, 1996.

CityKids All Star Club, ABC, 1996.

Nissan Presents a Celebration of America's Music, ABC, 1996.

Host, Sinbad's Summer Jam 3: 70's Soul Music Festival, HBO, 1997.

(Uncredited) Himself, George Carlin: 40 Years of Comedy, 1997.

The HBO Comedy Arts Weekend Highlight Show, HBO, 1997.

Himself, The American Red Cross Celebrates Real–Life Miracles, CBS, 1998.

Himself, Sinbad: Nuthin' but the Funk, HBO, 1998.

Host, Sinbad's Summer Jam 4: 70's Soul Music Festival (also known as Soul Music Festival: Part IV), HBO, 1998.

An Evening of Stars: A Celebration of Educational Excellence Benefitting the United Negro College Fund, Black Entertainment Television, 1998.

Masters of the Martial Arts Presented by Wesley Snipes, TNT, 1998.

Host, Sinbad's Soul Music Festival (also known as Soul Music Festival: Part 5), pay–per–view, 1999.

(Uncredited; in archive footage) Ossie David, Jr., Saturday Night Live: The Best of Chris Rock, NBC, 1999.

Master of ceremonies, Miss Universe Pageant (also known as The 49th Annual Miss Universe Pageant), CBS, 2000.

An Evening of Stars: A Celebration of Educational Excellence, syndicated, 2001.

(Uncredited; in archive footage) Himself, When Stand–Up Comics Ruled the World, VH1, 2004.

Himself, I Was a Network Star, 2006.

Himself, In the Company of Friends, TV–One Lifestyle and Entertainment Television, 2007.

Eddie Murphy: The Making of "Delirious," My Network TV, 2007.

Television Appearances; Awards Presentations:

Presenter, The Third Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1989.

The 16th Annual Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame, syndicated, 1989.

America's All–Star Tribute to Oprah Winfrey, ABC, 1990.

The 11th Annual Black Achievement Awards, ABC, 1990.

The 22nd Annual NAACP Image Awards, NBC, 1990.

Presenter, The Fifth Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1991.

The 17th Annual People's Choice Awards, CBS, 1991.

Host, The 19th Annual Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame, syndicated, 1992.

Presenter, The Sixth Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1992.

The Essence Awards, Fox, 1992.

The 24th Annual NAACP Image Awards, NBC, 1992.

Host, Soul Train Comedy Awards, syndicated, 1993.

Presenter, The 45th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards, ABC, 1993.

Presenter, The 25th NAACP Image Awards, NBC, 1993.

Presenter, The Walt Disney Company Presents the American Teacher Awards, Disney Channel, 1993.

The 1993 Billboard Music Awards, Fox, 1993.

The Seventh Annual American Comedy Awards, ABC, 1993.

Host, The Essence Awards, Fox, 1994.

Host, The 15th Annual Cable Ace Awards, TNT, 1994.

The 26th Annual NAACP Image Awards, NBC, 1994.

Cohost, The 25th Anniversary Essence Awards, Fox, 1995.

Presenter, First Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (also known as Screen Actors Guild First Annual Awards), NBC, 1995.

Presenter, The Ninth Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1995.

The Soul Train 25th Anniversary Hall of Fame Special, CBS, 1995.

Host, The 1996 Essence Awards (also known as 1996 Essence Awards), Fox, 1996.

Host, The 23rd Annual American Music Awards, ABC, 1996.

Presenter, The Blockbuster Entertainment Awards, UPN, 1996.

The 10th Annual Soul Train Music Awards, The WB, 1996.

The 27th Annual NAACP Image Awards, Fox, 1996.

Host, The ShoWest Awards, TNT, 1997.

Host, The 10th Essence Awards (also known as 10th Anniversary Essence Awards), Fox, 1997.

Host, The 24th Annual American Music Awards, ABC, 1997.

Presenter, The 28th NAACP Image Awards, Fox, 1997.

Host, The 25th Annual American Music Awards, ABC, 1998.

Hollywood Salutes Arnold Schwarzenegger, TNT, 1998.

The Kennedy Center Honors: A Celebration of the Performing Arts (also known as The Kennedy Center Honors), CBS, 1998.

The 12th Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 1998.

26th Annual American Music Awards, ABC, 1998.

The 30th NAACP Image Awards, Fox, 1999.

The 14th Annual Soul Train Music Awards, syndicated, 2000.

Host, NAACP Music Image Awards, The WB, 2001.

Host, The Movie Preview Awards, My Network TV, 2008.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

Contestant, Star Search, syndicated, multiple episodes, 1984–85.

Davis Sarette, "Say Hello to a Good Buy," The Cosby Show, NBC, 1987.

Himself, The New Hollywood Squares (also known as Hollywood Squares), syndicated, 1987.

Super Bloopers and New Practical Jokes, NBC, 1990.

Alan King: Inside the Comedy Mind, Comedy Central, 1991.

Ruben Stiles, "Roc and the Actor," Roc (also known as Roc Live), Fox, 1992.

Guest host, Saturday Night Live (also known as NBC's "Saturday Night," Saturday Night, Saturday Night Live '80, SNL, and SNL 25), NBC, 1992.

"Blood & Circulation," Bill Nye, the Science Guy (also known as Disney Presents "Bill Nye the Science Guy"), syndicated, 1994.

"Chemical Reactions," Bill Nye, the Science Guy (also known as Disney Presents "Bill Nye the Science Guy"), syndicated, 1994.

Sinboo and himself, All That, Nickelodeon, 1994.

Voice of Simpleton, "The Golden Goose," Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child (animated), HBO, 1995.

Voice of the frog prince, "The Frog Prince," Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child (animated), HBO, 1995.

Del, "Now Is the Time, the Walrus Said," Cosby, CBS, 1998.

Himself, Hollywood Squares (also known as H2 and H2: Hollywood Squares), syndicated, 1998.

Del, "Afterschool Delight," Cosby, CBS, 1999.

Del, "The Awful Truth," Cosby, CBS, 1999.

Himself, "Redd Foxx," The E! True Hollywood Story (also known as Redd Foxx: The E! True Hollywood Story and THS), E! Entertainment Television, 1999.

Voice of Big Bad Wolfgang, "The Three Little Pigs," Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child (animated), HBO, 1999.

Professor LeCount, "The Nutty Moesha," Moesha, UPN, 2000.

Himself, "Ed McMahon: America's Sidekick," Biography (also known as A&E Biography: Ed McMahon), Arts and Entertainment, 2000.

Himself, "Jamaic–Up?," Girlfriends, UPN, 2001.

Odell Mason, "El gato, el vato, la centa y el padre," Resurrection Blvd., Showtime, 2002.

Odell Mason, "Engano," Resurrection Blvd., Showtime,2002.

Odell Mason, "Resureccion," Resurrection Blvd., Show-time, 2002.

Himself, Ask Rita, syndicated, 2003.

Himself, TV Land Top Ten (also known as TV Land's Top Ten), TV Land, multiple episodes, 2004–2005.

Host, It's Showtime at the Apollo (also known as Show-time at the Apollo), syndicated, multiple episodes in 2005.

Himself, Comics Unleashed, syndicated, multiple episodes in 2006.

Himself, "Dennis Reynolds: An Erotic Life," It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia (also known as Sunny), FX Network, 2008.

Appeared in episodes of other programs, including The Big Laff Off, Showtime; Comic Justice, Comedy Central; Comic Strip: Live, Fox; and Instant Comedy with the Groundlings, FX Network.

Television Guest Appearances; Episodic:

The Arsenio Hall Show, syndicated, 1991, 1992.

The Chevy Chase Show, Fox, 1993.

Late Night with David Letterman, NBC, 1993.

Late Show with David Letterman (also known as The Late Show, Late Show Backstage, and Letterman),CBS, 1993, 1995.

The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, NBC, 1995, 1997, multiple appearances in 2005.

Howard Stern (also known as The Howard Stern Show), E! Entertainment Television, 1997.

Television Appearances; Pilots:

David Bryan, The Sinbad Show (also known as Sinbad and Ein Vater fuer zwei), Fox, 1993.

The Brandon T. Jackson Show, The N (Noggin), 2006.

Television Work; Series:

Creator and executive producer, The Sinbad Show (also known as Sinbad and Ein Vater fuer zwei), Fox, 1993–94.

Television Work; Movies:

Executive producer, The Cherokee Kid, HBO, 1996.

Television Executive Producer; Specials:

Sinbad and Friends All the Way LiveAlmost!, ABC, 1991.

"Sinbad: Brain Damaged," HBO Comedy Hour, HBO, 1991.

"Sinbad Live from the Paramount-Afros and Bellbottoms" (also known as "Afros and Bellbottoms" and "Sinbad: Afros and Bellbottoms"), HBO Comedy Hour, HBO, 1993.

Sinbad's Summer Jam: '70s Soul Music Festival (also known as Soul Music Festival: Part I), HBO, 1995.

"Sinbad–Son of a Preacher Man," HBO Comedy Hour, HBO, 1996.

Sinbad's Summer Jam II: '70s Soul Music Festival (also known as 70's Soul Music Festival: Part 2), HBO, 1996.

Sinbad's Summer Jam 3: 70's Soul Music Festival, HBO, 1997.

Sinbad: Nuthin' but the Funk, HBO, 1998.

Sinbad's Summer Jam 4: 70's Soul Music Festival (also known as Soul Music Festival: Part IV), HBO, 1998.

Sinbad's Soul Music Festival (also known as Soul Music Festival: Part 5), pay–per–view, 1999.

Film Appearances:

Stand–up comic, That's Adequate, Southgate Entertainment, 1989.

Andre Krimm, Necessary Roughness, Paramount, 1991.

Malik, The Meteor Man, Metro–Goldwyn–Mayer, 1993.

Otto, Coneheads (also known as Coneheads: The Movie), Paramount, 1993.

Kevin Franklin and Derek Bond, Houseguest, Buena Vista, 1995.

Myron Larabee, Jingle All the Way, Twentieth Century–Fox, 1996.

Sam Simms, First Kid, Buena Vista, 1996.

Voice of Riley, Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco (also known as Incredible Journey), Buena Vista, 1996.

Mr. Wheat, Good Burger, Paramount, 1997.

Orderly, Crazy as Hell, Artistic License/Loose Screw Films, 2001.

Security guard, Treading Water, 2002.

Voice of raven, Hansel & Gretel, Innovation Film Group, 2002.

Bennie, Cuttin Da Mustard, Double "D" Productions/ Reel Rebel Production/West Coast Film Ventures, 2006.

Leila's uncle, Leila (short film), Akrozee Productions/Hanelle Bay Productions, 2006.

Ryan Jackson, Sr., Stompin' (also known as Greekshow), Polychrome Pictures, 2007.

Himself, James Brown: The Man, the Music & the Message (documentary), 2008.

Film Executive Producer:

First Kid, Buena Vista, 1996.

Coda (short film), Akrozee Productions, 2006.

Leila (short film), Akrozee Productions/Hanelle Bay Productions, 2006.

Stompin' (also known as Greekshow), Polychrome Pictures, 2007.

Stage Appearances:

Stand–up comic at various venues; performed in children's theatres.

Major Tours; Stand–Up Comedy Tours:

Poverty Tour, 1980.

Share the Dream Tour, 1990.

Radio Appearances:

Himself, Howard Stern (episodic; also known as The Howard Stern Radio Show and The Howard Stern Show), 1997.

Host, Sinbad and Friends (series), KHHT–FM Radio(Hot 92.3), Los Angeles, beginning 2002.

Appeared in radio programs.

RECORDINGS

Videos:

Condom, Time Out: The Truth about HIV, AIDS, and You (also known as Time Out), Paramount, 1992.

Comedy Albums:

Brain Damaged, Wing/PolyGram, 1990.

WRITINGS

Teleplays; Specials:

Sinbad and Friends All the Way LiveAlmost!, ABC, 1991.

"Sinbad: Brain Damaged," HBO Comedy Hour, HBO, 1991.

"Sinbad Live from the Paramount-Afros and Bellbottoms" (also known as "Afros and Bellbottoms" and "Sinbad: Afros and Bellbottoms"), HBO Comedy Hour, HBO, 1993.

"Sinbad-Son of a Preacher Man," HBO Comedy Hour, HBO, 1996.

Sinbad: Nuthin' but the Funk, HBO, 1998.

Teleplays; Episodic:

Comedy material, Star Search, syndicated, multiple episodes, 1984–85.

Author of comedy material for other programs.

Teleplays; Pilots:

(Story) The Sinbad Show (also known as Sinbad and Ein Vater fuer zwei), Fox, 1993.

Writings for the Stage:

Poverty Tour, 1980.

Share the Dream Tour, 1990.

Author of comedy material for the stage.

Writings for the Radio:

Sinbad and Friends (series), KHHT–FM Radio (Hot 92.3), Los Angeles, beginning 2002.

Wrote material that has appeared in radio programs.

Comedy Albums:

Brain Damaged, Wing/PolyGram, 1990.

Humor:

(With David Ritz) Sinbad's Guide to Life (also known as Sinbad's Guide to Life: Because I Know Everything), Bantam Books, 1997.

OTHER SOURCES

Books:

Contemporary Black Biography, Volume 16, Gale, 1997.

St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, five volumes, St. James Press, 2000.

Periodicals:

Ebony, April, 1990, p. 104; June, 1997, p. 84.

Entertainment Weekly, April 5, 1996, p. 27; February 7, 1997, p. 63; October 31, 1997, p. 85.

Essence, November, 1992, p. 78.

Jet, November 22, 1993, pp. 56–58; July 13, 1998, p. 58; March 1, 1999, p. 41; August 16, 1999,p. 45.

TV Guide, July 14, 1990, p. 13.

Variety, October 27, 1997, p. 27; January 19, 1998,p. 69.

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"Sinbad 1956–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Sinbad 1956–." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/sinbad-1956-0

Sinbad 1956–

Sinbad 1956

Comedian, actor

At a Glance

Sources

Known for his clean comedy, stand-up comic Sinbad pulls off a rare feat of delivering stage monologues that are funny and outrageous without being profane. The son of a Baptist minister and divorced father of two children, Sinbad strongly feels that stories of life itself are the stuff of humor, and that profanity is not necessary to make people laugh. As he told Aldore Collier in Jet: Life unedited is funny.

Early in his career Sinbad found that getting rid of profanity in his act was a way of trusting his own comic instincts. Ill never forget it, he related to Collier. I was on stage and I was dying. I didnt really know how to do comedy and I was trying to write stuff rather than just be what I am. And I remember I cursed on stage. And it was the worst feeling I ever had. People were laughing, but I said I would quit comedy before I had to do that.... I went home and learned how to be myself. I learned that your life is funny.

The follies of male-female relationships are often the focus of Sinbads monologues. Relationships are just plain funny, he was quoted as saying by Collier. Only a wife or girlfriend could make a man act the way he does. Only a husband or boyfriend could make a woman act the way she acts. Sinbad frequently draws upon stories of his own family in his act.

Being funny has always been part of Sinbads life. The native of Benton Harbor, Michigan, was always the goofy kid, as he told a contributor to People. At 6 5, Sinbad originally aspired to be a basketball player, and thought that someday he might mix comedy and sports by being one of the Harlem Globetrotters. While he attended the University of Denver on a basketball scholarship, a knee injury forced him to give up the sport, and he left in 1978. Sinbad later joined the U.S. Air Force, and began working at stand-up comedy after he won a talent contest. Inspired, as the contributor to People relates, [Sinbad] set out to get himself discharged by walking off duty in his underwear. Just kick me out, he begged. Lets work as a team.

After he left the Air Force in 1983, Sinbad became a success on the comedy nightclub circuit in Los Angeles, and eventually was a seven-time winner on the television talent show, Star Search. He also performed as an opener for music groups the Pointer Sisters and Kool

At a Glance

Full name, David Adkins; born November 10, 1956; native of Benton Harbor, Ml; son of Louise and Donald Adkins (a Baptist minister); married Meredith, 1985, divorced 1992; children: Paige, Royce. Education: Studied at University of Denver.

Began performing comedy in the early 1980s; served in the U.S. Air Force until 1983; Television appearances: The Redd Foxx Show, played Brian Lightfoot, 1986; cohost, Keep on Crusin, 1987; played Walter Oakes on NBC-TV series, A Different World, c. 1989-91; Brain Damaged, 1991; host of Showtime at the Apollo, beginning in 1987-; Afros and Bellbottoms, 1993; The Sinbad Show, 1994; The Cherokee Kid, HBO special, 1996; Films: Necessary Roughness, 1991; Coneheads, 1993; Meteor Man (cameo appearance), 1993; Houseguest, 1995; Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco, voice of Riley, 1996; First Kid, 1996; Jingle All the Way, 1996; Son of A Preacher Man, HBO stand-up comedy special, 1996; Host, Sinbads Summer Jam, 70s Music Festival, 1995-; Author, Sinbads Guide to Life: Because I Know Everything, 1997.

Addresses: HomeSan Fernando Valley, CA; Agentc/o International Creative Management (I.C.M.), 8942 WilshireBlvd., Beverly Hills, CA 90211; Office David and Goliath Production Company, 11330 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA 91604.

and the Gang, and was a regular on the short-lived The Redd Foxx Show. Eventually, he did warm-ups for studio audiences on The Cosby Show, during which time his idol, Bill Cosby, helped land him a role on the hit NBC-TV series, A Different World.

Sinbads role on A Different World which humorously depicted the lives of students and faculty at an all-black collegewas the irreverent dormitory director and gym teacher Walter Oakes. A reviewer in Variety, who comments that the shows strength is its likable and energetic cast, added that dorm antics are infectiously led by the single-named Sinbad, who is delightful as the big guy struggling to keep order in a nonstop party house. In 1990, Sinbads character on the show was broadened to become a counselor. According to co-executive producer Susan Fales, as quoted in Jet, the move to make Sinbads character more serious was to increasingly address social problems, like sex education, teen pregnancy, and drugs and to have the popular Sinbad become the voice of whats happening in the Black community. In 1991 Sinbad left the show, while it was still a top ratings draw. However, he continued to pursue his comedy act in clubs across the country, where he now had newfound fame from appearing in a popular sitcom, which allowed him to received better engagements. Later in 1991, he appeared in an HBO special called Brain Damaged, based on his stand-up routine. Two years later Sinbad signed a contract with Fox-TV to appear in a sitcom-The Sinbad Show, which he played a single father of two foster children. Unfortunately, the show lasted only one season.

In 1993, HBO aired another Sinbad comedy special, Afros and Bellbottoms Sinbad has appeared and starred in several films, including his 1991 film debut in Necessary Roughness In 1995, he had a starring role in the film, Houseguest (with Phil Hartman). Reviews of the film were generally bad, however, Caryn James of the New York Times wrote Casting Sinbad was the single good idea of Houseguest. In 1996, Sinbad starred opposite Arnold Schwarzenegger in Jingle All the Way, a slapstick comedy, which Sinbad played Myron, a postal worker who gets into a competition with a businessman (Schwarzenegger) to buy a hard-to-get action figure toy for their sons. The film received mixed reviews.

A Big Fan of music from the seventies, Sinbad organizes the annual, Sinbads Summer Jam: 70s Music Festival in the Caribbean. HBO televises the annual festival. Sinbad explained to Esther Iverem of the Washington Post, When you listen to a 70s record, you dont hear about somebody killing someone or beating their woman. In 1996, Sinbad starred in an HBO comedy stand-up special, Son of A Preacher Man.

Sinbad and his ex-wife have joint custody of their two children. Each parent has the children on alternate weeks. When asked about his divorce he responds in Ebony, I dont think our divorce would have been nearly as traumatic if we werent in Hollywood, and there wasnt money and lawyers involved. He adds, Divorce is always going to be bad, but Hollywood just escalates that thing to the nth degree.

Sinbad lives in Californias San Fernando Valley. All five of his siblings live within a 20 mile radius of him, and all of his siblings are employed by him at his David and Goliath Production Company. He believes family is first, family is forever.

Sources

African American Almanac, Seventh Edition, Gale Research, 1996.

Current Biography, Gale Research, v. 58, n. 2, 1997, pp. 39-42.

Ebony, April 1990, June 1997, p. 84.

Jet, February 12, 1990; August 13, 1990.

People, September 29, 1986.

Variety, October 4-10, 1989.

Whos Who Among African Americans, 10th Edition, 1998/99.

Michael E. Mueller

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

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"Sinbad 1956–." Contemporary Black Biography. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Sinbad 1956–." Contemporary Black Biography. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/sinbad-1956

Sinbad 1957(?)—

Sinbad 1957(?)

Comedian, actor

At a Glance

Sources

Known for his clean comedy, stand-up comic Sinbad pulls off a rare feat of delivering stage monologues that are funny and outrageous without being profane. The son of a Baptist minister and married father of two children, Sinbad strongly feels that stories of life itself are the stuff of humor, and that profanity is not necessary to make people laugh. As he told Aldore Collier in Jet: Life unedited is funny.

Early in his career Sinbad found that getting rid of profanity in his act was a way of trusting his own comic instincts. Ill never forget it, he related to Collier. I was on stage and I was dying. I didnt really know how to do comedy and I was trying to write stuff rather than just be what I am. And I remember I cursed on stage. And it was the worst feeling I ever had. People were laughing, but I said I would quit comedy before I had to do that. I went home and learned how to be myself. I learned that your life is funny.

The follies of male-female relationships are often the focus of Sinbads monologues. Relationships are just plain funny, he was quoted as saying by Collier. Only a wife or girlfriend could make a man act the way he does. Only a husband or boyfriend could make a woman act the way she acts. Sinbad frequently draws upon stories of his own family in his act, in particular tales of his own marriage (he describes his wife as understanding). He commented in Ebony that such comedy really works because its about being on a stage and talking about everything that is wrong with all of us. And we realize, Man, Im not the only one whos messed up like this.

Being funny has always part of Sinbads life. The native of Benton Harbor, Michigan, was always the goofy kid, as he told a contributor to People. At 6 5, Sinbad originally aspired to be a basketball player, and thought that someday he might mix comedy and sports by being one of the Harlem Globetrotters. While he attended the University of Denver on a basketball scholarship, a knee injury forced him to give up the sport, and he left in 1978. Sinbad later joined the U.S. Air Force, and began working at stand-up comedy after he won a talent contest. Inspired, as the contributor to People relates, [Sinbad] set out to get himself discharged by walking off duty in his underwear. Just kick me out, he begged. Lets work as a team.

At a Glance

Full name, David Atkins; born c. 1957; native of Benton Harbor, Mich.; fathers name, Donald (a Baptist minister); married, 1985; wifes name, Meredith; children: Paige, Royce. Education: Studied at University of Denver.

Began performing comedy in the early 1980s; served in the U.S. Air Force until 1983; played Walter Oakes on NBC-TV series, A Different World, c. 1986; host of Showtime at the Apollo, beginning in 1989.

After he left the Air Force in 1983, Sinbad became a success on the comedy nightclub circuit in Los Angeles, and eventually was a seven-time winner on the television talent show, Star Search. He also performed as an opener for music groups the Pointer Sisters and Kool and the Gang, and was a regular on the short-lived The Redd Foxx Show. Eventually, he did warm-ups for studio audiences on The Cosby Show, during which time his idol, Bill Cosby, helped land him a role on the hit NBC-TV series, A Different World.

Sinbads role on A Different World which humorously depicts the lives of students and faculty at an all-black collegewas the irreverent dormitory director and gym teacher Walter Oakes. A reviewer in Variety, who comments that the shows strength is its likable and energetic cast, added that dorm antics are infectiously led by the single-named Sinbad, who is delightful as the big guy struggling to keep order in a nonstop party house. In 1990, Sinbads character on the show was broadened to become a counselor. According to co-executive producer Susan Fales, as quoted in Jet, the move to make Sinbads character more serious was to increasingly address social problems, like sex education, teen pregnancy, and drugs and to have the popular Sinbad become the voice of whats happening in the Black community.

Sources

Ebony, April 1990.

Jet, February 12, 1990; August 13, 1990.

People, September 29, 1986.

Variety, October 4-10, 1989.

Michael E. Mueller

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Sinbad

Sinbadad, add, Allahabad, bad, Baghdad, bedad, begad, cad, Chad, clad, dad, egad, fad, forbade, gad, glad, grad, had, jihad, lad, mad, pad, plaid, rad, Riyadh, sad, scad, shad, Strad, tad, trad •chiliad • oread •dryad, dyad, naiad, triad •Sinbad • Ahmadabad • Jalalabad •Faisalabad • Islamabad • Hyderabad •grandad • Soledad • Trinidad •doodad • Galahad • Akkad • ecad •cycad, nicad •ironclad • nomad • maenad •monad, trichomonad •gonad • scratch pad • sketch pad •keypad • helipad • launch pad •notepad • footpad • touch pad • farad •tetrad • Stalingrad • Leningrad •Conrad • Titograd • undergrad •Volgograd • Petrograd • hexad •Mossad • Upanishad • pentad •heptad • octad

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