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Igor

IGOR

(d. 945), second grand prince of Kiev, who, like his predecessor Oleg, negotiated treaties with Constantinople.

Igor, the alleged son of Ryurik, succeeded Oleg around 912. Soon after, the Primary Chronicle reports, the Derevlyane attempted to regain their independence from the prince of Kiev. Igor crushed the revolt and imposed an even heavier tribute on the tribe. In 915, when the Pechenegs first arrived in Rus, Igor concluded peace with them, but in 920 he was forced to wage war. After that, nothing is known of his activities until 941 when, for unexplained reasons, he attacked Byzantium with 10,000 boats and 40,000 men. His troops ravaged the Greek lands for several months. However, when the Byzantine army returned from Armenia and from fighting the Saracens, it destroyed Igor's boats with Greek fire. In 944 Igor sought revenge by allegedly launching a second attack. When the Greeks sued for peace, he conceded, sending envoys to Emperor Romanus Lecapenus to confirm the agreements that Oleg had concluded in 907 and 911. The treaty reveals that Igor had Christians in his entourage. They swore their oaths on the Holy Cross in the Church of St. Elias in Kiev, while the pagans swore their oaths on their weapons in front of the idol of Perun. In 945 the Derevlyane once again revolted against Igor's heavy-handed measures; when he came to Iskorosten to collect tribute from them, they killed him. His wife, the esteemed Princess Olga from Pskov, then became regent for their minor son Svyatoslav.

See also: grand prince; kievan rus; pechenegs; primary chronicle; rurikid dynasty

bibliography

Vernadsky, George. (1948). Kievan Russia. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Martin Dimnik

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Igor (1151–1202, Russian prince)

Igor (Igor Sviatoslavich) (ē´gər svyä´təslä´vĬch), 1151–1202, Russian prince. In 1185 he was defeated by the Cumans in an expedition that was immortalized in the epic Slovo o polku Igoreve (tr. by Vladimir Nabokov, The Song of Igor's Campaign, 1960). The author is unknown, but the date of composition has been established as c.1187. The manuscript was discovered in 1795 in a 16th-century transcript containing many errors in copying. Although its authenticity has been questioned, it is considered the first notable work of Russian literature. It is remarkable for thematic unity and for imagery, particularly descriptions of nature and invocations of pagan magic. The work was used by Borodin for his opera Prince Igor.

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Igor (d. 945, duke of Kiev)

Igor (ē´gôr, Russ. ē´gər) or Ihor (ē´khər), d. 945, duke of Kiev (912–45), successor of Oleg as ruler of Kievan Rus. According to the Russian Primary Chronicle, a medieval history, Igor was the son of Rurik, founder of the Russian princely line. Igor's expedition (941) against Constantinople was routed by the Greeks, and in 945 he concluded a new commercial treaty with the Byzantines. He was killed by rebellious Slavic tribespeople while attempting to collect tribute. His wife, St. Olga or Olha, served as regent for their son Sviatoslav after Igor's death.

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"Igor (d. 945, duke of Kiev)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved November 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/igor-d-945-duke-kiev

Igor

Igor •Igor • rigor • gewgaw

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"Igor." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Igor." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/igor

"Igor." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved November 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/igor