Skip to main content
Select Source:

narcosis

narcosis (närkō´sĬs), state of stupor induced by drugs. The use of narcotics as a therapeutic aid in psychiatry is believed to have a history dating back to the use of opium for mental disorders by the early Egyptians. Prolonged narcosis was employed at the beginning of the 20th cent.; its chief value was the reduction of excitement and tension in the psychotic patient. J. S. Horsley introduced (1936) the term narcoanalysis for the use of narcotics to induce a trancelike state in which the patient talks freely and intensive psychotherapy may be applied. It was used with considerable success in treatment of acute combat psychoneuroses during World War II.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"narcosis." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"narcosis." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/narcosis

"narcosis." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/narcosis

narcosis

narcosis From the Greek word meaning ‘to benumb’. A soporific or insensible state; a state produced by a narcotic drug. Regrettably the word ‘narcotic’ has been misused, especially in the US, where various narcotic agencies seem to call all drugs of abuse ‘narcotics’, whether they be heroin or cocaine, though the latter produces a state opposite to narcosis.

Alan W. Cuthbert


See analgesia; drug; opiates and opioid drugs.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"narcosis." The Oxford Companion to the Body. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"narcosis." The Oxford Companion to the Body. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/narcosis

"narcosis." The Oxford Companion to the Body. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/narcosis

narcosis

narcosis (nar-koh-sis) n. a state of diminished consciousness or complete unconsciousness caused by the use of narcotic (i.e. opioid) drugs. The body's normal reactions to stimuli are diminished and the body may become sedated or completely anaesthetized.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"narcosis." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"narcosis." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/narcosis

"narcosis." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/narcosis

narcosis

nar·co·sis / närˈkōsis/ • n. Med. a state of stupor, drowsiness, or unconsciousness produced by drugs. See also nitrogen narcosis.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"narcosis." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"narcosis." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/narcosis

"narcosis." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/narcosis