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contrast

con·trast • n. / ˈkänˌtrast/ the state of being strikingly different from something else, typically something in juxtaposition or close association: a contrast between rural and urban trends. ∎  the degree of difference between tones in a television picture, photograph, or other image. ∎  enhancement of the apparent brightness or clarity of a design provided by the juxtaposition of different colors or textures. ∎  the action of calling attention to notable differences. ∎  [in sing.] a thing or person having qualities noticeably different from another: the castle is quite a contrast to other places where the singer has performed. • v. / ˈkänˌtrast; kənˈtrast/ [intr.] differ strikingly: his friend's success contrasted with his own failure. ∎  [tr.] compare in such a way as to emphasize differences. DERIVATIVES: con·trast·ing·ly / ˈkänˌtrastinglē; kənˈtras-/ adv. con·tras·tive / kənˈtrastiv; ˈkänˌtras-/ adj. ORIGIN: late 17th cent. (as a term in fine art, in the sense ‘juxtapose so as to bring out differences in form and color’): from French contraste (noun), contraster (verb), via Italian from medieval Latin contrastare, from Latin contra- ‘against’ + stare ‘stand.’

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"contrast." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"contrast." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/contrast-0

"contrast." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/contrast-0

Contrast

Contrast

The relative difference in intensity between two stimuli and their effect on each other.

Contrast, or contrast effect, is the effect a visual stimulus has on another. When one stimulus is present, it affects the other. As can be seen in this illustration, two gray boxes of equal intensity are surrounded by, in one case, a white field, and in the other, a black field. The perceived shade of gray is affected by the contrasting field.

Psychologists also study the contrast threshold, the point at which differences in two stimuli can be detected. These tests are used in the study of visual perception and the ability to perceive spatial relationships. Understanding contrast effect has practical applications. For example, black and yellow have the lowest contrast effect, which means the largest percentage of the population can clearly detect the difference between these two colors. Therefore, black and yellow are the colors used to mark school buses and many traffic signs.

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"Contrast." Gale Encyclopedia of Psychology. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Contrast." Gale Encyclopedia of Psychology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/contrast

"Contrast." Gale Encyclopedia of Psychology. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/contrast

contrast

contrast
A. †contention XVI;

B. (in art) juxtaposition of varied forms, etc., to heighten effect; hence gen. XVIII. — F. contraste — It. contrasto strife, opposition, f. contrastare withstand, strive :- medL. contrāstāre, i.e. contrā against, stāre STAND.
So as vb. XVII.

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"contrast." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"contrast." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/contrast-1

"contrast." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/contrast-1

contrast

contrast In remote sensing, the ratio of energy emitted or reflected by an object to that emitted or reflected by its immediate surroundings.

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"contrast." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"contrast." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/contrast

"contrast." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/contrast

contrast

contrastaghast, avast, Belfast, blast, cast, caste, contrast, fast, last, mast, miscast, outlast, past, rat-arsed, unsurpassed, vast •steadfast • lightfast • holdfast •sunfast • colourfast • flabbergast •simulcast • telecast • typecast •forecast • broadcast • sportscast •downcast •outcast, outcaste •newscast • roughcast • upcast •opencast • worm cast • sandblast •Elastoplast • counterblast • mainmast •mizzenmast • topmast • foremast •fly-past

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"contrast." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"contrast." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/contrast

"contrast." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/contrast