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toxoid

toxoid, protein toxin treated by heat or chemicals so that its poisonous property is destroyed but its capacity to stimulate the formation of toxin antibodies, or antitoxins, remains. Because toxoids can be given in large quantities with no risk of tissue damage, they have superseded the highly poisonous toxins as immunizing agents against such diseases as diphtheria and tetanus.

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"toxoid." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"toxoid." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/toxoid

"toxoid." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved September 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/toxoid

toxoid

toxoid (toks-oid) n. a preparation of a toxin that has been rendered harmless by chemical treatment while retaining its antigenic activity. Toxoids are used in vaccines.

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"toxoid." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"toxoid." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/toxoid

"toxoid." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved September 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/toxoid