Skip to main content
Select Source:

cautery

cautery, searing or destruction of living animal tissue by use of heat or caustic chemicals. In the past, cauterization of open wounds, even those following amputation of a limb, was performed with hot irons; this served to close off the bleeding vessels as well as to discourage infection. In modern times cautery is used only on small lesions, e.g., to close off a bleeding point in the nasal mucous membrane or to eradicate a wart or other benign lesion. This is accomplished either by the application of a caustic substance such as nitric acid, or by the use of an electrically charged platinum wire (electrocautery).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"cautery." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"cautery." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/cautery

"cautery." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved July 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/cautery

cauterize

cau·ter·ize / ˈkôtəˌrīz/ • v. [tr.] Med. burn the skin or flesh of (a wound) with a heated instrument or caustic substance, typically to stop bleeding or prevent the wound from becoming infected. DERIVATIVES: cau·ter·i·za·tion / ˌkôtərəˈzāshən/ n.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"cauterize." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"cauterize." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cauterize

"cauterize." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved July 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cauterize

cauterize

cauterize XIV. — (O)F. cautériser — late L. cautērizāre, alt. — Gr. kautēriázein, f. kautḗrion, whence (through L. cautērium) cautery XIV cauterizing instrument, drug, or operation; ult. f. Gr. kaíein; see CAUSTIC, -IZE.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"cauterize." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"cauterize." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cauterize-0

"cauterize." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved July 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cauterize-0

cauterize

cauterize (kaw-tĕ-ryz) vb. to destroy tissues by direct application of a heated instrument (known as a cautery): used for the removal of small warts or other growths and also to stop bleeding from small vessels.
cautery n.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"cauterize." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"cauterize." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cauterize

"cauterize." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved July 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cauterize