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palpitation

palpitation (păl´pĬtā´shən), abnormal heartbeat that is often associated with a sensation of fluttering or thumping. The normal heartbeat is not noticeable to the individual. Palpitation may be a symptom of organic heart disease or of other body disorders such as an overactive thyroid gland or anemia. In healthy persons palpitation can be brought on by undue exertion, shock, excitement, or stimulants.

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"palpitation." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"palpitation." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/palpitation

"palpitation." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved May 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/palpitation

palpitate

pal·pi·tate / ˈpalpiˌtāt/ • v. [intr.] [often as adj.] (palpitating) (of the heart) beat rapidly, strongly, or irregularly: it wakened him in the night with a palpitating heart. ∎  shake; tremble: she was palpitating with terror.

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"palpitate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"palpitate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/palpitate-0

"palpitate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved May 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/palpitate-0

palpitation

palpitation (pal-pi-tay-shŏn) n. an awareness of the heartbeat. This is normal with fear, emotion, or exertion. It may also be a symptom of neurosis, arrhythmias, heart disease, and overactivity of the circulation.

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"palpitation." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"palpitation." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/palpitation

"palpitation." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved May 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/palpitation

palpitation

pal·pi·ta·tion / ˌpalpiˈtāshən/ • n. (usu. palpitations) a noticeably rapid, strong, or irregular heartbeat due to agitation, exertion, or illness.

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"palpitation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"palpitation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/palpitation

"palpitation." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved May 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/palpitation

palpitate

palpitate XVII. f. pp. stem of L. palpitāre, frequent. of palpāre stroke; see PALPABLE, -ATE3.
So palpitation XVII. — L.

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"palpitate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"palpitate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/palpitate-1

"palpitate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved May 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/palpitate-1

palpitate

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"palpitate." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"palpitate." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/palpitate

"palpitate." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved May 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/palpitate