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sense

sense / sens/ • n. 1. a faculty by which the body perceives an external stimulus; one of the faculties of sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch: the bear has a keen sense of smell that enables it to hunt at dusk. 2. a feeling that something is the case: she had the sense of being a political outsider. ∎  an awareness or feeling that one is in a specified state: you can improve your general health and sense of well-being. ∎  (sense of) a keen intuitive awareness of or sensitivity to the presence or importance of something: she had a fine sense of comic timing. 3. a sane and realistic attitude to situations and problems: he earned respect by the good sense he showed at meetings. ∎  a reasonable or comprehensible rationale: I can't see the sense in leaving all the work to you. 4. a way in which an expression or a situation can be interpreted; a meaning: it is not clear which sense of the word “characters” is intended in this passage. 5. chiefly Math. Physics a property, e.g., direction of motion, distinguishing a pair of objects, quantities, effects, etc., that differ only in that each is the reverse of the other. ∎  [as adj.] Genetics relating to or denoting a coding sequence of nucleotides, complementary to an antisense sequence. • v. [tr.] perceive by a sense or senses: with the first frost, they could sense a change in the days. ∎  be aware of: she could sense her father's anger rising. ∎  be aware that something is the case without being able to define exactly how one knows: he could sense that he wasn't liked. ∎  (of a machine or similar device) detect: an optical fiber senses a current flowing in a conductor. PHRASES: bring someone to their (or come to one's) senses restore someone to (or regain) consciousness. ∎  cause someone to (or start to) think and behave reasonably after a period of folly or irrationality. in a (or one) sense used to indicate a particular interpretation of a statement or situation: in a sense, behavior cannot develop independently of the environment. in one's senses fully aware and in control of one's thoughts and words; sane: would any man in his senses invent so absurd a story? make sense be intelligible, justifiable, or practicable. make sense of find meaning or coherence in: she must try to make sense of what was going on. out of one's senses in or into a state of insanity. a sense of direction a person's ability to know without explicit guidance the direction in which they are or should be moving. take leave of one's senses (in hyperbolic use) go insane.

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"sense." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"sense." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sense-0

"sense." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sense-0

SENSE

SENSE. A term whose meanings range from physical faculties (such as the sense of sight) through analogous faculties of mind or spirit (a sense of humour), intelligence (Show some sense!), and what is logical and proper (the opposite of nonsense) to MEANING (the sense of a text) and the idea that many words have submeanings (X used in the sense of Y; the various senses of the word ‘mark’). Although people agree that words may have different ‘senses’, there is no agreed means of establishing just how many senses many polysemous (many-sensed) words have. The boundaries between senses are not always clear: a sense may be precise and restricted or vague and diffuse, and may be susceptible to analysis into more or less easily delineated subsenses. Identifying a sense may depend on knowledge and experience, social and situational context, the reason for analysing a word, the policy used by compilers of a particular dictionary, the method of displaying words in that dictionary, the amount of detail to be provided, and different theories about what words are and of how they should be discussed and defined. As the accompanying table shows, dictionaries can differ considerably as to the main sense divisions of such words as walk and crane.

Dictionary

Number of senses of:

walk

crane

noun

verb

noun

verb

CoED (1986)

15

11

4

3

LDEL (1984)

5

12

3

2

AHD (1985)

7

4

4

2

ChED (1988)

25

20

4

4

Key: CoED Collins English Dictionary, LDEL Longman Dictionary of the English Language, AHD American Heritage Dictionary, ChED Chambers English Dictionary.



See HOMONYM, POLYSEMY.

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"SENSE." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"SENSE." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/sense

"SENSE." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/sense

sense

sense, faculty by which external or internal stimuli are conveyed to the brain centers, where they are registered as sensations. Sensory reception occurs in higher animals through a process known as transduction, in which stimuli are converted into nerve impulses and relayed to the brain. The four commonly known special senses (sight, hearing, smell, and taste) are concerned with the outer world, and external stimuli are received and conducted by sensory receptors concentrated in the eye, ear, olfactory organ, and the taste buds. The so-called somatic senses respond to both external and internal stimuli. Although most of the somatic receptors are located in the skin (conveying the external sensations of touch, heat, cold, pressure, and pain), others are located in internal organs (e.g., the heart and the stomach). Somatic sensations such as hunger, thirst, and fatigue are thought to originate in specific areas of the nervous system. The sense of balance, or equilibrium, is related to the flow of endolymph, a fluid found in the inner ear.

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"sense." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"sense." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/sense

"sense." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/sense

sense

sense meaning, signification XIV; faculty of perception or sensation; actual perception or feeling XVI. — L. sēnsus faculty of feeling, sensibility, mode of feeling, thought, meaning, f. sēns-, pp. stem of sentīre feel.
Hence sense vb. perceive (in several techn. uses). XVI. sensuous XVII (-uous). So sensible perceptible by the senses XIV; cognizant, conscious XV; having good sense XVI. — (O)F. or L. sensitive having sensation. XIV. — (O)F. or medL. sensorium seat of sensation in the brain. XVII. — late L. sensual (-AL1) XV. — late L.

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"sense." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"sense." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/sense-1

senses

senses Means by which animals gain information about their environment and physiological condition. The five senses (sight, hearing, taste, smell, and touch) all rely on specialized receptors in sense organs on or near the external surface of the body. Internal sense organs are the hypothalamus of the brain and muscle stretch receptors stimulated by muscle movements.

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"senses." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"senses." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 12, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/senses

"senses." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 12, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/senses

sense

sense (sens) n. one of the faculties by which the qualities of the external environment are appreciated – sight, hearing, smell, taste, or touch. s. organ a collection of specialized cells (receptors), connected to the nervous system, that is capable of responding to a particular stimulus from either outside or inside the body.

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"sense." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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sense

sense To determine the condition or content of a signal or storage location. When used in reference to a storage location the word has the same meaning as ‘read’.

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"sense." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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sense

senseaskance, expanse, finance, Hans, Hanse, manse, nance, Penzance, Romance •underpants • happenstance •advance, Afrikaans, à outrance, chance, dance, enhance, entrance, faience, France, glance, lance, mischance, outdance, perchance, prance, Provence, stance, trance •nuance • tap-dance • square dance •freelance • convenance •cense, commence, common sense, condense, dense, dispense, expense, fence, hence, Hortense, immense, offence (US offense), pence, prepense, pretence (US pretense), sense, spence, suspense, tense, thence, whence •ring-fence • recompense •frankincense •chintz, convince, evince, Linz, mince, Port-au-Prince, prince, quince, rinse, since, Vince, wince •province •bonce, ensconce, nonce, ponce, response, sconce •séance • pièce de résistance •announce, bounce, denounce, flounce, fluid ounce, jounce, mispronounce, ounce, pounce, pronounce, renounce, trounce •dunce, once

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"sense." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 12 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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