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puncture

punc·ture / ˈpəngkchər/ • n. a small hole in a tire resulting in an escape of air: she was on her way home when she had a puncture. ∎  a small hole in something such as the skin, caused by a sharp object: surgeons operate through small punctures in the skin | [as adj.] a puncture wound. • v. [tr.] make such a hole in (something): one of the knife blows had punctured a lung. ∎  [intr.] sustain such a small hole: the tire had punctured and it would have to be replaced. ∎ fig. bring about a dramatic reversal in (mood or behavior) resembling a sudden deflation or collapse: the earlier mood of optimism was punctured. ORIGIN: late Middle English: from Latin punctura, from punct- ‘pricked,’ from the verb pungere. The verb dates from the late 17th cent.

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"puncture." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"puncture." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/puncture-0

"puncture." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved September 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/puncture-0

puncture

puncture (punk-cher)
1. n. a wound made accidentally or deliberately by a sharp object or instrument. needle p. a puncture using a hollow needle to withdraw a sample of tissue (especially from the liver, bone marrow, or breast) for examination for diagnostic purposes. See also lumbar (puncture).

2. vb. to pierce a tissue with a sharp instrument.

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"puncture." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"puncture." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/puncture

"puncture." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved September 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/puncture

puncture

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"puncture." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"puncture." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/puncture

"puncture." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved September 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/puncture