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double-jointed

double-jointed Some individuals are referred to as being ‘double-joined’. In reality these individuals do not have ‘double’ joints, but have a greater than average range of joint mobility — the joints are hypermobile. This can have career advantages (e.g. for contortionists) but can sometimes result in painful joints even though there is no clinical evidence of joint disease (hypermobility syndrome).

William R. Ferrell


See joints.

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"double-jointed." The Oxford Companion to the Body. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"double-jointed." The Oxford Companion to the Body. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/double-jointed

"double-jointed." The Oxford Companion to the Body. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/double-jointed

double-jointed

dou·ble-joint·ed • adj. (of a person) having unusually flexible joints, typically those of the fingers, arms, or legs.

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"double-jointed." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 13 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"double-jointed." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 13, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/double-jointed

"double-jointed." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 13, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/double-jointed