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polonaise

polonaise (Fr.), Polonäse (Ger.), polacca (It.). A nat. Polish dance, in simple triple time and of moderate speed; it should, perhaps, more properly be described as a stately ceremonial procession rather than a dance, and probably originated among the aristocracy in 16th cent. Certain rhythms are characteristic, such as the frequent division of the first beat of the measure with accentuation of its 2nd half, the ending of phrases on the 3rd beat of the measure, etc. Many composers, incl. Bach, Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert, have written polonaises; Chopin's 13 examples, in which he found an outlet for his patriotic feeling, are outstanding.

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"polonaise." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"polonaise." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/polonaise

"polonaise." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved June 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/polonaise

polonaise

pol·o·naise / ˌpäləˈnāz; ˌpō-/ • n. 1. a slow dance of Polish origin in triple time, consisting chiefly of an intricate march or procession. ∎  a piece of music for this dance or in its rhythm. 2. hist. a woman's dress with a tight bodice and a skirt open from the waist downward, looped up to show a decorative underskirt. • adj. (of a dish, esp. a vegetable dish) garnished with chopped hard-boiled egg yolk, breadcrumbs, and parsley.

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"polonaise." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"polonaise." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/polonaise-0

"polonaise." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/polonaise-0

polonaise

polonaise (pŏl´ənāz´, ō´–), Polish national dance, in moderate 3–4 time and of slow, stately movements. It evolved from peasant and court processions and ceremonies of the late 16th cent. and was later used by J. S. and W. F. Bach, Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, and Liszt. Chopin, exiled from Poland, expressed his patriotic fervor in 13 polonaises.

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"polonaise." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"polonaise." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/polonaise

"polonaise." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/polonaise

polonaise

polonaise female dress orig. suggested by that of Polish women; slow dance of Polish origin. XVIII. — F., sb. use of fem. of polonais Polish.

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"polonaise." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"polonaise." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/polonaise-1

"polonaise." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved June 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/polonaise-1

polonaise

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"polonaise." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"polonaise." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/polonaise

"polonaise." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved June 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/polonaise