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tetrachord

tetrachord (Gr. ‘four string’). Succession of four notes contained within compass of a perfect fourth. In Ancient Gr. mus. a tetrachord consisted of 4 notes descending through a perfect fourth in the order tone-tone-semitone (A–G–F–E) and joined together to form a series of eight-note modes. The modern diatonic scale is divisible into two tetrachords (C–D–E–F, and G–A–B–C).

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"tetrachord." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tetrachord." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tetrachord

"tetrachord." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tetrachord

tetrachord

tet·ra·chord / ˈtetrəˌkôrd/ • n. Mus. a scale of four notes, the interval between the first and last being a perfect fourth. ∎ hist. a musical instrument with four strings.

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"tetrachord." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tetrachord." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tetrachord

"tetrachord." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tetrachord