Skip to main content
Select Source:

Akhnaten

Akhnaten (d. c.1362 bc) Ancient Egyptian king of the 18th dynasty (r. c.1379–1362 bc). He succeeded his father, Amenhotep III, as Amenhotep IV. In an attempt to overthrow the influence of the priests of the Temple of Amun at Luxor, he renounced the old gods and introduced an almost monotheistic worship of the sun god, Aten. He adopted the name Akhnaten and established a new capital at Akhetaten (modern Tell el-Amarna). After his death Tutankhamun reinstated Amun as national god, and the capital reverted to Luxor.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Akhnaten." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Akhnaten." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/akhnaten

"Akhnaten." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/akhnaten

Akhnaten

Akhnaten. Opera in 3 acts by Glass to lib. by composer, S. Goldman, R. Israel, and R. Riddell. Comp. 1980–3. F.p. Stuttgart 1984, Houston 1984, London (ENO) 1985.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Akhnaten." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Akhnaten." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/akhnaten

"Akhnaten." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/akhnaten