Skip to main content
Select Source:

gigue

gigue, giga (Fr., It.). Jig.
1. A lively rustic Eng., Scot., and Irish dance type (see jig), usually in compound duple or triple time, with the characteristic rhythm etc. Eng. virginalists were first to use the gigue, which was introduced to the Continent by Froberger, 1657, though the term had appeared in 1648 in a lute piece by Ebner. Pieces in gigue style were absorbed into the suite as the customary closing movts.: in Bach's gigues the 2 halves of binary form often opened in something like fugal style, the subject of the first half being often inverted as that of the 2nd half. (Occasionally Bach applied the term ‘gigue’ loosely to a piece in simple duple or quadruple time.)

2. Medieval name for str. instr.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"gigue." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"gigue." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/gigue

"gigue." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved September 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/gigue

gigue

gigue: see jig.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"gigue." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"gigue." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/gigue

"gigue." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved September 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/gigue