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elegy

elegy, in Greek and Roman poetry, a poem written in elegiac verse (i.e., couplets consisting of a hexameter line followed by a pentameter line). The form dates back to 7th cent. BC in Greece and poets such as Archilochus, Mimnermus, and Tytraeus. Later taken up and developed in Roman poetry, it was widely used by Catullus, Ovid, and other Latin poets. In English poetry, since the 16th cent., the term elegy designates a reflective poem of lamentation or regret, with no set metrical form, generally of melancholy tone, often on death. The elegy can mourn one person, such as Walt Whitman's "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd" on the death of Abraham Lincoln, or it can mourn humanity in general, as in Thomas Gray's "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard." In the pastoral elegy, modeled on the Greek poets Theocritus and Bion, the subject and friends are depicted as nymphs and shepherds inhabiting a pastoral world in classical times. Famous pastoral elegies are Milton's "Lycidas," on Edward King; Shelley's "Adonais," on John Keats; and Matthew Arnold's "Thyrsis," on Arthur Hugh Clough.

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"elegy." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"elegy." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/elegy

"elegy." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/elegy

elegy

elegy song of lamentation; poem in elegiac metre. XVI. — F. élégie — L. elegīa — Gr. elegeíā (sb. use of adj., sc. ōidḗ ode), f. élegos (flute-) song, lament, of unkn. orig.; see -Y3.
So elegiac pert. to elegy, written or writing in a metre consisting of alternate hexameters and pentameters. XVI. — late L. — Gr.

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"elegy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"elegy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elegy-2

"elegy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elegy-2

elegy

el·e·gy / ˈeləjē/ • n. (pl. -gies) a poem of serious reflection, typically a lament for the dead. ∎  a piece of music in a mournful style. ORIGIN: early 16th cent.: from French élégie, or via Latin, from Greek elegeia, from elegos ‘mournful poem.’

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"elegy." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"elegy." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elegy-1

"elegy." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elegy-1

elegy

elegy in Greek and Roman poetry, a poem written in elegiac couplets, as notably by Catullus and Propertius; in modern literature, a poem of serious reflection, typically a lament for the dead. The word is recorded from the early 16th century and comes via French or Latin from Greek elegeia, from elegos ‘mournful poem’.

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"elegy." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"elegy." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elegy

"elegy." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elegy

elegy

elegy, élégie (Fr.). A song of lament for the dead or for some melancholy event, or an instr. comp. with that suggestion, such as Elgar's Elegy for Strings and Fauré's Élégie.

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"elegy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"elegy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elegy

"elegy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elegy

elegy

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"elegy." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 28 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"elegy." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 28, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elegy-0

"elegy." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved April 28, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/elegy-0