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aphorism

aph·o·rism / ˈafəˌrizəm/ • n. a pithy observation that contains a general truth, such as, “if it ain't broke, don't fix it.” ∎  a concise statement of a scientific principle, typically by an ancient classical author. DERIVATIVES: aph·o·rist n. aph·o·ris·tic / ˌafəˈristik/ adj. aph·o·ris·ti·cal·ly / ˌafəˈristik(ə)lē/ adv. aph·o·rize / -ˌrīz/ v.

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"aphorism." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"aphorism." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/aphorism-0

"aphorism." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved June 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/aphorism-0

aphorism

aphorism (ăf´ərĬz´əm), short, pithy statement of an evident truth concerned with life or nature; distinguished from the axiom because its truth is not capable of scientific demonstration. Hippocrates was the first to use the term for his Aphorisms, briefly stated medical principles. Note his famous opening sentence: "Life is short, art is long, opportunity fleeting, experimenting dangerous, reasoning difficult."

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"aphorism." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"aphorism." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/aphorism

"aphorism." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved June 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/aphorism

aphorism

aphorism a concise statement of a scientific principle, typically by a classical author; a pithy observation which contains a general truth. The word comes from the ‘Aphorisms of Hippocrates’, and was transferred to other sententious statements of the principles of physical science, and then to statements of principles generally.

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"aphorism." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"aphorism." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/aphorism

"aphorism." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved June 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/aphorism

aphorism

aphorism XVI. — F. aphorisme, or late L. aphorismus — Gr. aphorismós, f. aphorízein define, f. APO- + horizein (see HORIZON).

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"aphorism." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Jun. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"aphorism." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (June 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/aphorism-1

"aphorism." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved June 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/aphorism-1