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collocate

col·lo·cate / ˈkäləˌkāt/ • v. 1. [intr.] Linguistics (of a word) be habitually juxtaposed with another with a frequency greater than chance: “maiden” collocates with “voyage.” 2. [tr.] rare place side by side or in a particular relation. • n. Linguistics a word that is habitually juxtaposed with another with a frequency greater than chance.

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"collocate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"collocate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/collocate

"collocate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/collocate

collocate

collocate place side by side. XVI. f. L. collocāre, -āt-, f. COL- + locāre place, LOCATE.
So collocation XVII.

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"collocate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"collocate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/collocate-0

"collocate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/collocate-0