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ANTONOMASIA

ANTONOMASIA [Stress: ‘an-to-no-MAY-zy-a’].
1. In RHETORIC, the use of an EPITHET to acknowledge a quality in one person or place by using the name of another person or place already known for that quality: Henry is the local Casanova; Cambridge is England's Silicon Valley.

2. The use of an epithet instead of the name of a person or thing: the Swan of Avon William Shakespeare.

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"ANTONOMASIA." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"ANTONOMASIA." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/antonomasia

"ANTONOMASIA." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/antonomasia

antonomasia

an·to·no·ma·sia / anˌtänəˈmāzh(ē)ə/ • n. Rhetoric the substitution of an epithet or title for a proper name (e.g., the Bard for Shakespeare). ∎  the use of a proper name to express a general idea (e.g., a Scrooge for a miser).

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"antonomasia." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"antonomasia." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/antonomasia

"antonomasia." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/antonomasia