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dope

dope / dōp/ • n. 1. inf. a drug taken illegally for recreational purposes, esp. marijuana or heroin. ∎  a drug given to a racehorse or greyhound to inhibit or enhance its performance. ∎  a drug taken by an athlete to improve performance: [as adj.] he failed a dope test. 2. inf. a stupid person: though he wasn't an intellectual giant, he was no dope, either. 3. inf. information about a subject, esp. if not generally known: our reviewer will give you the dope on hot spots around the town. 4. a varnish applied to the fabric surface of model aircraft to strengthen them and keep them airtight. ∎  a thick liquid used as a lubricant. • v. [tr.] 1. administer drugs to (a racehorse, greyhound, or athlete) in order to inhibit or enhance sporting performance: the horse was doped before the race. ∎  (be doped up) inf. be heavily under the influence of drugs, typically illegal ones: he was so doped up that he can't remember a thing. ∎  treat (food or drink) with drugs: maybe they had doped her Perrier. ∎  [intr.] inf., dated regularly take illegal drugs. 2. smear or cover with varnish or other thick liquid: she doped the surface with photographic emulsion. 3. Electr. add an impurity to (a semiconductor) to produce a desired electrical characteristic. • adj. black slang very good: that suit is dope! PHRASAL VERBS: dope something out inf., dated work out something: they met to dope out plans for covering the event.DERIVATIVES: dop·er n. ORIGIN: early 19th cent. (in the sense ‘thick liquid’): from Dutch doop ‘sauce,’ from doopen ‘to dip, mix.’

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dope

dope (orig. U.S.) lubricating fluid; opium or other narcotic XIX. — Du. doop sauce, f. doopen dip, mix, adulterate (rel. to DIP), whence dope vb.

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dope

dopeaslope, cope, dope, elope, grope, hope, interlope, lope, mope, nope, ope, pope, rope, scope, slope, soap, taupe, tope, trope •myope • telescope • periscope •stereoscope • bioscope • stroboscope •kaleidoscope • CinemaScope •gyroscope • microscope • horoscope •stethoscope • antelope • envelope •zoetrope • skipping-rope • tightrope •towrope • heliotrope • lycanthrope •philanthrope • thaumatrope •misanthrope •isotope, radioisotope

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