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disport

dis·port / disˈpôrt/ • v. [intr.] archaic or humorous enjoy oneself unrestrainedly; frolic: a painting of lords and ladies disporting themselves by a lake. • n. diversion from work or serious matters; recreation or amusement: the King and all his Court were met for solace and disport. ∎ archaic a pastime, game, or sport.

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"disport." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"disport." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disport

"disport." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disport

disport

disport †divert; refl. enjoy oneself, frolic. XIV. — AN. desporter (cf. F. déporter DEPORT), f. des- DIS- 1 + porter carry.
So disport sb. (arch.) diversion, pastime. XIV. — OF. desport, f. the vb. Aphetic SPORT.

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"disport." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"disport." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disport-0

"disport." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/disport-0