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discard

dis·card • v. / disˈkärd/ [tr.] get rid of (someone or something) as no longer useful or desirable: Hilary bundled up the clothes she had discarded. ∎  (in bridge, whist, and similar card games) play (a card that is neither of the suit led nor a trump), when one is unable to follow suit. • n. / ˈdisˌkärd/ a person or thing rejected as no longer useful or desirable. ∎  (in bridge, whist, and similar card games) a card played which is neither of the suit led nor a trump, when one is unable to follow suit. DERIVATIVES: dis·card·a·ble / disˈkärdəbəl/ adj.

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"discard." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"discard." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/discard

"discard." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/discard

discard

discard reject (a card) from the hand; cast off, abandon. XVI. f. DIS- 4 + CARD 2.

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"discard." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"discard." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/discard-0

"discard." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/discard-0