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devote

de·vote / diˈvōt/ • v. [tr.] 1. (devote something to) give all or a large part of one's time or resources to (a person, activity, or cause): I wanted to devote more time to my family she devoted herself to fund-raising. 2. archaic invoke or pronounce a curse upon. ORIGIN: late 16th cent. (in the sense ‘dedicate formally, consecrate’): from Latin devot- ‘consecrated,’ from the verb devovere, from de- ‘formally’ + vovere ‘to vow.’

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"devote." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"devote." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 15, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/devote

"devote." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 15, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/devote

devote

devote XVI. f. dēvōt-, pp. stem of L. dēvovēre, f. DE- 3 + vovēre vow.
Hence devotee XVII. See -EE. So devotion XIII. — (O)F. — L.

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"devote." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"devote." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 15, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/devote-0

"devote." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 15, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/devote-0