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detract

de·tract / diˈtrakt/ • v. 1. [intr.] (detract from) reduce or take away the worth or value of: these quibbles in no way detract from her achievement. ∎  [tr.] deny or take away (a quality or achievement) so as to make its subject seem less impressive: it detracts not one iota from the credit due to them. 2. [tr.] (detract someone/something from) divert or distract (someone or something) away from: the complaint was timed to detract attention from the ethics issue. DERIVATIVES: de·trac·tion / -ˈtrakshən/ n. de·trac·tive / -ˈtraktiv/ adj.

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"detract." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"detract." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/detract

"detract." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/detract

detract

detract XV. f. dētract-, pp. stem of L. dētrahere draw off, take away, disparage, f. DE- 2 + trahere draw.
So detraction XIV. — (O)F. — L.

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"detract." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"detract." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/detract-0

"detract." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved October 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/detract-0