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coloration

col·or·a·tion / ˌkələˈrāshən/ • n. 1. a visual appearance with regard to color. some bacterial structures take on a purple coloration. ∎  the natural color or variegated markings of animals or plants: the red coloration of many maples. ∎  a scheme or method of applying color. 2. a specified pervading character or tone of something: the movement has taken on a fundamentalist coloration. ∎  a variety of musical or vocal expression: a skillful singer can do much with coloration.

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"coloration." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"coloration." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coloration

"coloration." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coloration

coloration

coloration XVII. — F. coloration or late L. colōrātiō, -ōn-, f. colōrāre COLOUR; see -ATION.
So coloratura (mus.) XIX. — It.; see -URE. colorific XVII. — F. or modL.

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"coloration." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"coloration." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coloration-0

"coloration." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved October 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/coloration-0