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colligate

col·li·gate / ˈkäləˌgāt/ • v. 1. Linguistics be or cause to be juxtaposed or grouped in a syntactic relation: [intr.] the two grammatical items are said to colligate | [tr.] pronouns are regularly colligated with verbal forms. 2. [tr.] connect; unite. ∎ Logic join or relate (apparently unrelated facts) into a pattern, esp. to reveal a general principle. DERIVATIVES: col·li·ga·tion / ˌkäləˈgāshən/ n.

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"colligate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"colligate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/colligate

"colligate." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/colligate

colligate

colligate bind together. XVI. f. pp. stem of L. colligāre, f. COL- + ligāre bind; see -ATE 2.

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"colligate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"colligate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 23, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/colligate-0

"colligate." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 23, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/colligate-0