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bother

both·er / ˈbä[voicedth]ər/ • v. 1. take the trouble to do something: nobody bothered locking the doors the driver didn't bother to ask why. 2. (of a circumstance or event) worry, disturb, or upset (someone): secrecy is an issue that bothers journalists. ∎  trouble or annoy (someone) by interrupting or causing inconvenience: she didn't feel she could bother Mike with the problem. ∎  [intr.] feel concern about or interest in: don't bother about me—I'll find my own way home [as adj.] (bothered) I'm not particularly bothered about how I look. • n. effort, worry, or difficulty: he saved me the bother of having to come up with a speech. ∎  (a bother) a person or thing that causes worry or difficulty: I hope she hasn't been a bother. ∎  a nuisance or inconvenience: it's no bother, it's on my way home. PHRASES: hot and bothered in a state of anxiety or physical discomfort. ORIGIN: late 17th cent. (as a noun in the dialect sense ‘noise, chatter’): of Anglo-Irish origin; probably related to Irish bodhaire ‘noise,’ bodhraim ‘deafen, annoy.’ The verb (originally dialect) meant ‘confuse with noise’ in the early 18th cent.

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"bother." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bother." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bother-0

"bother." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bother-0

bother

bother (dial.) bewilder with noise, confuse; pester, worry. XVIII. — Ir. bodhraim deafen.
Hence bother sb. XIX.

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"bother." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bother." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bother-1

"bother." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bother-1

bother

botherblather, foregather, gather, slather •farther, father, lather, rather •grandfather • stepfather • godfather •forefather •altogether, feather, heather, leather, nether, tether, together, weather, wether, whether •bather • sunbather •bequeather, breather •dither, hither, slither, swither, thither, whither, wither, zither •either, neither •bother, pother •Rhondda • mouther • loather •smoother, soother •another, brother, mother, other, smother, t'other •grandmother • stepmother •godmother • housemother •stepbrother • further

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"bother." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bother." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bother

"bother." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bother