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around

a·round / əˈround/ • adv. 1. (Brit. also round) located or situated on every side: the mountains towering all around. ∎  so as to surround someone or something: everyone crowded around. ∎ fig. so as to give support and companionship: if one girl is distraught, the others will rally around. ∎  with circular motion: the boats were spun around by waterspouts. ∎  so as to cover or take in the whole area surrounding a particular center: she paused to glance around admiringly at the décor. ∎  so as to reach everyone in a particular group or area: he passed a newspaper clipping around. 2. (Brit. also round) so as to rotate and face in the opposite direction: Jack seized her by the shoulders and turned her around. ∎  so as to lead in another direction: it was the last house before the road curved around. ∎  used in describing the position of something, typically with regard to the direction in which it is facing or its relation to other items: the picture shows the pieces the wrong way around. ∎  used to describe a situation in terms of the relation between people, actions, or events: it was he who was attacking her, not the other way around. 3. (Brit. also round) so as to reach a new place or position, typically by moving from one side of something to the other: he made his way around to the back of the building. ∎  in or to many places throughout a locality: his only ambition is to drive around in a sports car. ∎  used to convey an ability to navigate or orient oneself: I like pupils to find their own way around. ∎ inf. used to convey the idea of visiting someone else: why don't you come around to my office? ∎  randomly or unsystematically; here and there: one of them was glancing nervously around. 4. (Brit. also round) in existence, in the vicinity, or in active use: there was no one around. ∎  near at hand: he would want to have her around as much as possible. 5. approximately; about: software costs would be around $1,500| [as prep.] I returned to my hotel around 3 a.m. • prep. (Brit. also round) 1. on every side of: the hills around the city. ∎  (of something abstract) having (the thing mentioned) as a focal point: our entire culture is built around those loyalties. 2. in or to many places throughout (a community or locality): cycling around the village. ∎  on the other side of (a corner or obstacle): Steven parked the car around the corner. ∎  so as to hit (something) in passing: if he didn't shut up, he might get a slap around the ear. 3. so as to encircle or embrace (someone or something): he put his arm around her. ∎  (of a person's arm or arms) partially encircling (another person) as part of a gesture of affection: Mike put an arm around Mary. ∎  following an approximately circular route: he walked around the airfield. ∎  so as to cover or take in the whole area of (a place): she went around the house and saw that all the windows were barred. PHRASES: around the bendsee bend1 . have been around inf. have a lot of varied experience and understanding of the world.

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"around." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"around." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/around-0

"around." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/around-0

around

around XIV (not frequent before XVI). In earliest use perh. after OF. a la reonde roundabout; later f. A-1 + ROUND1.

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"around." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"around." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/around-1

"around." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/around-1

around

aroundabound, aground, around, astound, bound, compound, confound, dumbfound, expound, found, ground, hound, impound, interwound, mound, pound, profound, propound, redound, round, sound, stoneground, surround, theatre-in-the-round (US theater-in-the-round), underground, wound •spellbound • westbound • casebound •eastbound • windbound • hidebound •fogbound • stormbound •northbound • housebound •outbound • southbound • snowbound •weatherbound • earthbound •hellhound • greyhound • foxhound •newshound • wolfhound •bloodhound • background •battleground • campground •fairground • playground •whip-round • foreground •showground • merry-go-round •runaround • turnaround • ultrasound •pre-owned, unowned •unchaperoned • poind • untuned •Lund

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"around." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"around." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 18, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/around

"around." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 18, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/around