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willow-pattern ware

willow-pattern ware, sometimes porcelain but frequently opaque pottery, originated in Staffordshire, England, c.1780. Thomas Minton (see Minton, family), then an apprentice potter, developed and engraved the design, presumably after an old Chinese legend. It portrays the garden of a rich mandarin whose young daughter elopes with his secretary. The lovers, overtaken on the bridge by her father, are transformed by the gods into birds and flutter beyond his reach. The scene with its willow tree covers the central part of a plate, dish, or bowl, with a border of butterflies, daggers, a fret, or other motif. The blue-and-white chinaware on which it appeared became immensely popular, and the design was reproduced with variations by many European potters and even in Asia, where it is still constantly employed, most of the ware being exported to Western countries.

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"willow-pattern ware." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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willow

willow traditionally a symbol of unrequited love, or of mourning or loss, as in wear the willow and the willow garland.
willow pattern a conventional design representing a Chinese scene in blue on white pottery, typically showing three figures on a bridge, with a willow tree and two birds above. It was introduced by the English potter Thomas Turner (1749–1809).

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"willow." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"willow." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/willow

"willow." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved November 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/willow

willow

wil·low / ˈwilō/ • n. (also willow tree) a tree or shrub (genus Salix, family Salicaceae) of temperate climates that typically has narrow leaves, bears catkins, and grows near water. Its pliant branches yield osiers for basketry.

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"willow." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"willow." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/willow-1

"willow." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved November 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/willow-1

willow

willow See SALIX.

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"willow." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"willow." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 22, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/willow

"willow." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved November 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/willow

willow

willowaloe, callow, fallow, hallow, mallow, marshmallow, sallow, shallow, tallow •Pablo, tableau •cashflow • Anglo • matelot •Carlo, Harlow, Marlowe •Bargello, bellow, bordello, cello, Donatello, fellow, jello, martello, mellow, morello, niello, Novello, Pirandello, Portobello, Punchinello, Uccello, violoncello, yellow •pueblo • bedfellow • playfellow •Oddfellow • Longfellow •schoolfellow • Robin Goodfellow •airflow • halo • Day-Glo •filo, kilo •armadillo, billow, cigarillo, Murillo, Negrillo, peccadillo, pillow, tamarillo, Utrillo, willow •inflow • Wicklow • furbelow • Angelo •pomelo • uniflow •kyloe, lilo, milo, silo •Apollo, follow, hollow, Rollo, swallow, wallow •Oslo • São Paulo • outflow •bolo, criollo, polo, solo, tombolo •rouleau • regulo • modulo • mudflow •diabolo • bibelot • pedalo • underflow •buffalo •brigalow, gigolo •bungalow •Michelangelo, tangelo •piccolo • tremolo • alpenglow • tupelo •contraflow • afterglow • overflow •furlough • workflow

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"willow." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Nov. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"willow." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved November 22, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/willow-0