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Proteus

Proteus

Proteus was an ancient Greek god also known as the old man of the sea. He served as a shepherd for the sea god Neptune*, watching over his flocks of seals. In return, Neptune gave Proteus the gift of prophecy.

prophecy foretelling of what is to come; also something that is predicted

Proteus possessed knowledge of all thingspast, present, and futurebut was reluctant to reveal his knowledge. He would answer questions only if caught. The only way to catch him was to sneak up on him at noontime when he took his daily nap. However, Proteus also had the ability to change shape at will. Once he was seized, it was necessary to hold him tightly until he returned to his natural form. Then he would answer any question put to him. The legend of Proteus gave rise to the term protean, which means able to assume different forms.

See also Greek Mythology; Neptune.

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"Proteus." Myths and Legends of the World. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Proteus." Myths and Legends of the World. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/proteus

Proteus

Proteus in Greek mythology, a minor sea god, son of Oceanus and Tethys, who had the power of prophecy but who would assume different shapes to avoid answering questions; his name can be applied allusively to a changing, varying, or inconstant person or thing.

In 1989, the name Proteus was given to a satellite of Neptune, the sixth closest to the planet, discovered by the Voyager 2 space probe.

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"Proteus." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Proteus." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/proteus

"Proteus." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/proteus

Proteus

Proteus (family Enterobacteriaceae) A genus of Gram-negative bacteria in which the cells are usually rod-shaped, but may vary from ovoid to filamentous under certain conditions. They are motile, with many flagella. They are found chiefly in the intestines and faeces of animals, including humans. Some species can cause disease.

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"Proteus." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Proteus." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 17, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/proteus-0

"Proteus." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/proteus-0

Proteus (in Greek mythology)

Proteus (prō´tēəs, –tyōōs), in Greek mythology, prophetic old man of the sea who tended the seals of Poseidon. He could change himself into any shape he pleased, but if he were nevertheless seized and held, he would foretell the future. The word protean is derived from his name.

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"Proteus (in Greek mythology)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Proteus

Proteus In Greek mythology, a sea god, son of Oceanus and Tethys. He is depicted as a little old man of the sea. Proteus possessed the gift of prophecy and the ability to alter his form at will; in an instant he could become fire, flood or a wild beast.

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"Proteus." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Proteus." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/proteus

Proteus

Proteus (proh-ti-ŭs) n. a genus of rodlike Gram-negative flagellate highly motile bacteria common in the intestines and in decaying organic material. P. vulgaris a species that can cause urinary tract infections.

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"Proteus." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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proteus

proteus (Gr. and Rom. myth.) sea-god fabled to change his shape, transf. and fig. XVI; amoeba; genus of bacteria; genus of amphibians XIX. — L. — Gr. Proteús.
Hence protean changing, varying. XVI.

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"proteus." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"proteus." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/proteus-1

Proteus

ProteusBierce, fierce, Pearce, Peirce, pierce, tierce •Fabius, scabious •Eusebius •amphibious, Polybius •dubious • Thaddeus • compendious •radius • tedious •fastidious, hideous, insidious, invidious, perfidious •Claudiuscommodious, melodious, odious •studious • Cepheus •Morpheus, Orpheus •Pelagius • callipygous • Vitellius •alias, Sibelius, Vesalius •Aurelius, Berzelius, contumelious, Cornelius, Delius •bilious, punctilious, supercilious •coleus • Julius • nucleus • Equuleus •abstemious •Ennius, Nenniuscontemporaneous, cutaneous, extemporaneous, extraneous, instantaneous, miscellaneous, Pausanias, porcellaneous, simultaneous, spontaneous, subcutaneous •genius, heterogeneous, homogeneous, ingenious •consanguineous, ignominious, Phineas, sanguineous •igneous, ligneous •Vilnius •acrimonious, antimonious, ceremonious, erroneous, euphonious, felonious, harmonious, parsimonious, Petronius, sanctimonious, Suetonius •Apollonius • impecunious •calumnious • Asclepius • impious •Scorpius •copious, Gropius, Procopius •Marius • pancreas • retiarius •Aquarius, calcareous, Darius, denarius, gregarious, hilarious, multifarious, nefarious, omnifarious, precarious, Sagittarius, senarius, Stradivarius, temerarious, various, vicarious •Atreus •delirious, Sirius •vitreous •censorious, glorious, laborious, meritorious, notorious, uproarious, uxorious, vainglorious, victorious •opprobrious •lugubrious, salubrious •illustrious, industrious •cinereous, deleterious, imperious, mysterious, Nereus, serious, Tiberiuscurious, furious, injurious, luxurious, penurious, perjurious, spurious, sulphureous (US sulfureous), usurious •Cassius, gaseous •Alcaeus • Celsius •Theseus, Tiresias •osseous, Roscius •nauseous •caduceus, Lucius •Perseus • Statius • Propertius •Deo gratias • plenteous • piteous •bounteous •Grotius, Photius, Proteus •beauteous, duteous •courteous, sestertius •Boethius, Prometheus •envious • Octavius •devious, previous •lascivious, niveous, oblivious •obvious •Vesuvius, Vitruviusimpervious, pervious •aqueous • subaqueous • obsequious •Dionysius

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"Proteus." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Dec. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"Proteus." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 17, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/proteus-0