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nymph (in Greek mythology)

nymph (nĬmf), in Greek mythology, female divinity associated with various natural objects. It is uncertain whether they were immortal or merely long-lived. There was an infinite variety of nymphs. Some represented various localities, e.g., acheloids, or nymphs of the River Achelous; others were identified with the part of nature in which they dwelled, e.g., oreads, or mountain nymphs; and still others were associated with a particular function of nature, e.g., hamadryads, or tree nymphs, whose lives began and ended with that of a particular tree. Nymphs were represented as young, beautiful, musical, amorous, and gentle, although some were associated with the wilder aspects of nature and were akin to satyrs; others were vengeful and capable of destruction, as in the story of Daphne. Other important nymphs were naiads, nymphs of streams, rivers, and lakes; nereids, daughters of Nereus, who lived in the depths of the Mediterranean Sea; dryads, tree nymphs; and oceanids, 3,000 ocean nymphs who were the daughters of Oceanus. Arethusa, Thetis, Calypso, and Echo were famous nymphs. The nymphs' cult was widespread in Greece.

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"nymph (in Greek mythology)." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Nymph

472. Nymph

  1. Atlantides (Pleiades ) seven daughters of Atlas by Pleione. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 37]
  2. Camenae fountain nymphs; identified with Greek Muses. [Rom. Myth.: Zimmerman, 49]
  3. dryads divine maidens of the woods. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 108]
  4. hamadryads wood nymphs. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 113]
  5. Hyades seven daughters of Atlas, entrusted with the care of the infant Dionysus. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 134]
  6. limoniads nymphs of meadows and flowers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 152]
  7. naiads divine maidens of lakes, streams, and fountains. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 256]
  8. Napaeae nymphs of woodland glens and vales. [Rom. Myth.: Howe, 174]
  9. Nereids sea nymphs of the Mediterranean. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 257]
  10. Oceanids sea nymphs of the great oceans. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 263]
  11. oreads divine maidens of the mountains. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 270]

Obesity (See FATNESS .)

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"Nymph." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Nymph." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/nymph

"Nymph." Allusions--Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. . Retrieved September 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/nymph

nymph

nymph / nimf/ • n. 1. a mythological spirit of nature imagined as a beautiful maiden inhabiting rivers, woods, or other locations. ∎ chiefly poetic/lit. a beautiful young woman. 2. an immature form of an insect that does not change greatly as it grows, e.g., a dragonfly, mayfly, or locust. Compare with larva. ∎  an artificial fly made to resemble the aquatic nymph of an insect, used in fishing. 3. a mainly brown butterfly (subfamily Satyrinae, family Nymphalidae) that frequents woods and forest glades. DERIVATIVES: nymph·al / ˈnimfəl/ adj. nym·phe·an / ˈnimfēən/ adj. nymph·like / -līk/ adj. ORIGIN: late Middle English: from Old French nimphe, from Latin nympha, from Greek numphē ‘nymph, bride.’

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"nymph." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"nymph." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved September 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/nymph-1

nymph

nymph a mythological spirit of nature imagined as a beautiful maiden inhabiting rivers, woods, or other locations. Recorded from late Middle English, the word comes via Old French and Latin from Greek numphē ‘nymph, bride’, and is related to Latin nubere ‘be the wife of’.

In literary use from the early 17th century, nymph may be used for a river or stream.
nymphaeum a grotto or shrine dedicated to a nymph or nymphs; a building or part of a building built to represent such a shrine.

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"nymph." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved September 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/nymph

nymph

nymph In Greek mythology, a female nature spirit who was said to be a guardian of natural objects. Nymphs were identified with specific locations, often with trees and water.

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"nymph." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Sep. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"nymph." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 21, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/nymph

"nymph." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved September 21, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/nymph