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photorealism

photorealism, international art movement of the late 1960s and 70s that stressed the precise rendering of subject matter, often taken from actual photographs or painted with the aid of slides. Also known as superrealism, the style stressed objectivity and technical proficiency in producing images of photographic clarity, often street scenes or portraits. Well-known American photorealists include the painters Chuck Close and Richard Estes and the sculptor Duane Hanson.

See also contemporary art.

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photorealism

photorealism Realistic representation in a computer-graphics image so that it looks as though it was produced by photographing a scene.

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"photorealism." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"photorealism." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/photorealism

"photorealism." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/photorealism