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pantograph

pan·to·graph / ˈpantəˌgraf/ • n. 1. an instrument for copying a drawing or plan on a different scale by a system of hinged and jointed rods. 2. a jointed framework conveying a current to a train, streetcar, or other electric vehicle from overhead wires. DERIVATIVES: pan·to·graph·ic / ˌpantəˈgrafik/ adj.

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"pantograph." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pantograph." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pantograph

"pantograph." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pantograph

pantograph

pantograph instrument for the mechanical copying of a design. XVIII. — F. pantographe, f. Gr. PANTO- + -graphos -GRAPH.

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"pantograph." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 26 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pantograph." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 26, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pantograph-0

"pantograph." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved April 26, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pantograph-0