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tower

tower, structure, the greatest dimension of which is its height. Towers have belonged to two general types. The first embodies practical uses such as defense (characteristic of the Middle Ages), to carry bells, beacons, or antennas, and to utilize maximum floor space in a given area, as in modern skyscrapers. The second type is used to symbolize the authority and power of religious and civic bodies, as in the churches and town halls of Europe; skyscrapers also perform a similar function for modern corporations. The earliest use of tall structures for ritual and symbolism is seen in the Babylonian ziggurat. The temple architecture of India had a variety of pyramidal and cylindrical masonry towers. The many-storied pagoda in wood was a part of early Chinese and Japanese temple architecture. The minaret belongs to Islamic religious architecture. Used for defensive purposes in the early Middle Ages in Western Europe, towers with massive masonry walls served as refuges and lookouts. Many 9th- and 10th-century round defense towers remain in Ireland and a few in Scotland, including one at Brechin. Castles had their donjons or keeps, of which the 11th-century Tower of London shows a high development. Of the fortified towers that Italian nobles built even for their city dwellings numerous examples remain, notably at San Gimignano. The earliest existing church towers in Europe were those of the 5th and 6th cent. in Ravenna, Italy. There the bell tower, or campanile, stood detached from the church building itself; another example is the celebrated bell tower at Pisa (1174). In English and French Romanesque churches a high tower rises over the crossing of nave and transepts, and the west end generally possesses lower twin towers. The relatively simple Romanesque towers generally had square or round shafts with many blind arcades in horizontal tiers and were topped by a simple octagonal or conical spire. They developed into the higher, elaborate type of Gothic, decorated with pinnacles and canopied niches. Towers of extreme lightness and intricacy were developed in the late Gothic period, as in the cathedrals at Rouen, Vienna, and Antwerp. With the Renaissance the classical orders were incorporated into tower design. Particular success was attained in the tapering pyramidal compositions of Sir Christopher Wren's numerous London towers, including those of St. Paul's Cathedral. English churches, e.g., St. Martin-in-the-Fields by James Gibbs, set the pattern for the typical New England church with the wooden tower and steeple rising directly over the entrance vestibule. In the 20th cent. towers have often taken the form of skyscrapers. Notable modern towers of varied design and function include the highly original Einstein Tower at Potsdam by Erich Mendelsohn and Frank Lloyd Wright's Johnson tower with glass tubing at Racine, Wis.

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"tower." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tower." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/tower

"tower." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/tower

tower

tower a tower is the emblem of St Barbara.
Tower Bridge a bridge across the Thames in London, famous for its twin towers and for the two bascules of which the roadway consists, able to be lifted to allow the passage of large ships. It was completed in 1894.
Tower of London a fortress by the Thames just east of the City of London. The oldest part, the White Tower, was begun in 1078. It was later used as a state prison, and is now open to the public as a repository of ancient armour and weapons, and of the Crown jewels (which have been kept there since the time of Henry III).
tower of silence a tall open-topped structure on which Parsees traditionally place and leave exposed the body of someone who has died.
tower of strength a source of strong and reliable support; perhaps originally alluding to the Book of Common Prayer ‘O Lord…be unto them a tower of strength.’
tower pound a pound weight of 5400 grains (= 11 ¼ Troy ounces), which was the legal mint pound of England prior to the adoption of the Troy pound of 5760 grains in 1526.

See also ivory tower, Twin Towers at twin.

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"tower." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tower." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower

"tower." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower

tower

tow·er / ˈtou(-ə)r/ • n. 1. a tall narrow building, either freestanding or forming part of a building such as a church or castle. ∎  a tall structure that houses machinery, operators, etc. ∎  a tall structure used as a receptacle or for storage: a CD tower. ∎  a tall pile or mass of something: a titanic tower of garbage. ∎  (the Tower) see Tower of London. 2. a place of defense; a protection. • v. [intr.] 1. rise to or reach a great height: he seemed to tower over everyone else. 2. (of a bird) soar to a great height, esp. (of a falcon) so as to be able to swoop down on the quarry. PHRASES: tower of strengthsee strength.DERIVATIVES: tow·ered adj. ( chiefly poetic/lit. ). tow·er·y adj. ( poetic/lit. ).

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"tower." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tower." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower-1

"tower." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower-1

tower

tower. Tall structure of any form on plan, high in proportion to its lateral dimensions, often rising in stages (rather than storeys), free-standing or part of another building, used in fortifications, as points of reference in the landscape, or as a belfry attached to a church. Church-towers often have buttresses, are crowned with battlements, or support spires, and have important architectural features. See also steeple.

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"tower." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tower." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower

"tower." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower

Tower

Tower

a raised pile of something that resembles a tower.

Examples : tower of buttered Yorkshire cake, 1840; of his conscience, 1483; of giraffesHare, 1939; of hawks (high flying Hoby hawks), 1575; of heaven, 1240; of lace, 1852; of pikes; of state, 1605; of timber (siege tower), 1483; of waves, c. 1400; of wood (siege tower), 1665; secret tower of his heart, 1374.

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"Tower." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Tower." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower-0

"Tower." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower-0

tower

tower A piece of equipment, such as a computer system box, whose dimensions are such that height > depth > width. A large tower might be free-standing on the floor, while a smaller one might be a deskside unit and the smallest ones stand on the desktop. See also midi-tower.

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"tower." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tower." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower

"tower." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower

tower

tower sb. XII. ME. tūr, later tour, towr — AN., OF. tur, tor (mod. tour) :- L. turris, turr- -Gr. túrris, túrsis, túrsos.
Hence tower vb. rise to a great height; soar like a hawk. XVI.

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"tower." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tower." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower-2

"tower." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower-2

tower

towerbower, cower, devour, dower, embower, empower, endower, flour, flower, gaur, Glendower, glower, hour, lour, lower, our, plougher (US plower), power, scour, shower, sour, Stour, sweet-and-sour, tower •Beckenbauer • Eisenhower •Schopenhauer • safflower •passion flower • bellflower •mayflower • cauliflower • wallflower •cornflour, cornflower •sunflower • elderflower • man-hour •Adenauer • manpower • brainpower •willpower • horsepower • firepower •water power • rush hour •watchtower •anoa, Balboa, blower, boa, foregoer, goer, grower, hoer, jerboa, knower, Krakatoa, Lebowa, lower, moa, mower, Mururoa, Noah, o'er, proa, protozoa, rower, Samoa, sewer, Shenandoah, shower, sower, spermatozoa, Stour, thrower, tower •shadower • widower • racegoer •theatregoer (US theatergoer) •churchgoer • echoer •follower, swallower •snowblower • lawnmower • genoa •winnower • harrower • winegrower •borrower • burrower • vetoer

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"tower." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Aug. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"tower." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (August 20, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower-0

"tower." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved August 20, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tower-0