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pagoda

pagoda (pəgō´də), name given in the East to a variety of buildings of tower form that are usually part of a temple or monastery group and serve as shrines. Those of India (see stupa) are chiefly pyramidal structures of masonry, tapering to an apex and elaborately adorned with carving and sculpture. In China the pagoda, derived from India, is one of the most characteristic architectural types and in general is devoted to sacred usage. Octagonal, hexagonal, or square in plan, they are built in superimposed stories, sometimes as many as 15; from each story projects an upward-curving tiled roof. The material most commonly used is brick, often faced with slabs of glazed and colored tile. A few date back to the T'ang dynasty (AD 618–906). In Japan the pagodas were introduced from China with Buddhism. They are usually square in plan and five stories high, each story having its projecting roof. Generally made of wood, they exhibit superb carpentry craftsmanship. The Horyu-ji tower near Nara, of the 7th cent., is a noted example.

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"pagoda." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"pagoda." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/pagoda

Pagoda

Pagoda (poss. from dāgaba, ‘relic-container’, via Portuguese). Buddhist structure, developed from the Indian stūpa, and often a name for a stūpa. Its many variations contain characteristic features in common: they are usually raised and narrow structures, with four or eight sides, with several levels and prominent eaves. On the top is a post with many rings encircling it. Pagodas, like stūpas, contain relics (śarīra) of a/the Buddha, or of a famous teacher/master. They express the Buddhist cosmos in symbolic form. A pagoda is thus a maṇḍala in its own right.

In the history of Buddhist architecture, the placing of the pagoda is the issue which then dominates the overall layout and design of Buddhist temple areas and monasteries. The geographical solutions to the problem are diverse, but always provide a clue to the religious priorities of the community and age involved.

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"Pagoda." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Pagoda." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pagoda

"Pagoda." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pagoda

pagoda

pagoda a Hindu or Buddhist temple or sacred building, typically a many-tiered tower, in India and the Far East. Recorded from the late 16th century, the word comes from Portuguese pagode, perhaps based on Persian butkada ‘temple of idols’, influenced by Prakrit bhagodī ‘divine’.
pagoda-tree a mythical tree humorously supposed to produce pagodas, in this sense gold or silver coins formerly current in southern India; the expression shake the pagoda-tree meant to make a fortune in India under the East India Company.

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"pagoda." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"pagoda." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pagoda

pagoda

pagoda. European term for a tall structure, often polygonal on plan, of several separately roofed stories marked by upturned eaves, fretwork brackets, and, often, ornaments resembling bells (campanulae) suspended from the eaves. Based on Chinese templetowers, pagodas were used as garden-buildings in the C18 Chinoiserie manner (e.g. Chambers's Pagoda at Kew Gardens, London).

Bibliography

Conner (1979);
Honour (1961);
Impey (1977);
Lampugnani (ed.)& Dinsmoor (1986);
Jane Turner (1996)

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"pagoda." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"pagoda." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pagoda

pagoda

pagoda Eastern temple in the form of a multi-storeyed, tapering tower. The basic design is either square or polygonal, and each storey is a smaller replica of the one beneath. The storeys often have wide, overhanging roofs, and the buildings are usually made of wood, brick, or stone. Pagodas originated in India and spread with the diffusion of Buddhism to China, Korea, and Japan.

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pagoda

pa·go·da / pəˈgōdə/ • n. a Hindu or Buddhist temple or sacred building, typically a many-tiered tower, in India and the Far East. ∎  an ornamental imitation of this.

pagoda

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"pagoda." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"pagoda." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 24, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pagoda-1

"pagoda." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pagoda-1

pagoda

pagoda idol temple; idol; coin of S. India (from the figure thereon). XVII (pagod(e) XVI). — Pg. pagode, prob. ult. — Pers. butkada idol temple, f. but idol + kada habitation.

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"pagoda." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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pagoda

pagodadodder, fodder, plodder, prodder •Isolde, solder •absconder, anaconda, Fonda, Golconda, Honda, nonda, ponder, responder, squander, Wanda, wander, yonder •hot-rodder •awarder, boarder, border, defrauder, hoarder, Korda, marauder, order, recorder, sordor, warder •alder, Balder, Calder •launder, maunder •sailboarder • skateboarder •keyboarder • snowboarder •camcorder • video recorder •chowder, Gouda, howdah, Lauda, powder •bounder, compounder, expounder, flounder, founder, grounder, impounder, pounder, propounder, rounder, sounder •gunpowder •Clodagh, coda, coder, exploder, loader, Oder, odour (US odor), pagoda, Rhoda, Sargodha, Schroder, soda, vocoder •beholder, boulder, folder, holder, moulder (US molder), polder, scolder, shoulder, smoulder (US smolder), upholder, withholder •cardholder • shareholder •stakeholder •freeholder, keyholder •leaseholder • copyholder •policyholder • stockholder •smallholder, stallholder •householder • freeloader •avoider, embroider •joinder • Schadenfreude

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"pagoda." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Apr. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"pagoda." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved April 24, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/pagoda-0