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module

module
1. A programming or specification construct that defines a software component. Often a module is a unit of software that provides users with some data types and operations on those data types, and can be separately compiled. The module has an interface in the form of a heading that specifies the data types and operations the module provides its users. Mathematically, the syntax of the interface is a signature and the semantics of a module is a class of algebras of that signature. In some programming languages that provide modules, they are called by other names such as package, cluster, or object. The concept developed as a programming construct to support information hiding and abstract data types. The theory of program construction based on modules is a promising, but difficult, area of research.

2. A component of a hardware system that can be subdivided.

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"module." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"module." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved October 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/module

module

mod·ule / ˈmäjoōl/ • n. each of a set of standardized parts or independent units that can be used to construct a more complex structure, such as an item of furniture or a building. ∎  an independent self-contained unit of a spacecraft. ∎  Comput. any of a number of distinct but interrelated units from which a program may be built up or into which a complex activity may be analyzed.

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"module." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"module." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/module-0

"module." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/module-0

module

module:1 Term derived from the Latin modulus, a unit of measure in classical architecture equal to half the diameter of a column at its base. This unit was used in proportioning the classical orders of architecture. 2 The modern module is an interchangeable building unit used in construction; these units are mass-produced and therefore easily replaced and economical.

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"module." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"module." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved October 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/module

module

module.
1. Unit of length used in multiples to determine proportion, in Classicism the module is reckoned to be the diameter or the radius of a column-shaft at its base, subdivided into 60 or 30 minutes.

2. In modular design a unit of measurement in prefabricated construction, or industrialized building enabling ease of reproduction of repetitive standard components.

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"module." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"module." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 16, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/module

"module." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved October 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/module

module

moduleBanjul, befool, Boole, boule, boules, boulle, cagoule, cool, drool, fool, ghoul, Joule, mewl, misrule, mule, O'Toole, pool, Poole, pul, pule, Raoul, rule, school, shul, sool, spool, Stamboul, stool, Thule, tomfool, tool, tulle, you'll, yule •mutule • kilojoule • playschool •intercool • Blackpool •ampoule (US ampule) • cesspool •Hartlepool • Liverpool • whirlpool •ferrule, ferule •curule • cucking-stool • faldstool •toadstool • footstool • animalcule •granule • capsule • ridicule • molecule •minuscule • fascicule • graticule •vestibule • reticule • globule •module, nodule •floccule • noctule • opuscule •pustule • majuscule • virgule

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"module." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Oct. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"module." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved October 16, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/module