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bungalow

bungalow. Corruption of the Hindustani bangla, meaning ‘belonging to Bengal’, applied to one-storey lightly built detached dwellings, often with thatched roofs and surrounded by a verandah. The word appears as Bungales as early as 1676 in relation to housing for servants of the East India Company, but as bungalow certainly by 1711. The word was later applied to describe single-storey houses throughout the British Empire and in the USA, and became usual to indicate any single-storey detached house (often a second home by the seaside or, more usually, a first house in a suburb, especially immediately after the 1914–18 war). Some large isolated bungalows were erected on land owned by J. P. Seddon at Birchington, North-East Kent, from the late 1860s, to designs by John Taylor and Seddon himself: the Indian idiom was preserved, with broad overhanging roofs and side verandahs, in Tower Bungalows (1880s—which also had sgraffito decoration between the applied timber decorations).

Bibliography

A. King (1982);
Lancaster (1985)

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"bungalow." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bungalow." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bungalow

"bungalow." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved May 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bungalow

bungalow

bungalow [Indian bangla,=house], dwelling built in a style developed from that of a form of rural house in India. The original bungalow typically has one story, few rooms, and a maximum of cross drafts, with high ceilings, unusually large window and door openings, and verandas on all sides to shade the rooms from the intense light and tropical heat. Dwellings of this general type became popular in S California, with numerous differences in plan and materials, and were termed bungalows. The word thus came to be used for a cottage or for any small house with verandas covered by low, wide eaves.

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"bungalow." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bungalow." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/bungalow

"bungalow." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved May 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/bungalow

bungalow

bun·ga·low / ˈbənggəˌlō/ • n. a low house, with a broad front porch, having either no upper floor or upper rooms set in the roof, typically with dormer windows.

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"bungalow." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bungalow." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bungalow-0

"bungalow." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved May 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bungalow-0

bungalow

bungalow XVII (bungale). — Gujarati bangalo — Hind. banglā belonging to Bengal.

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"bungalow." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bungalow." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bungalow-1

"bungalow." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved May 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bungalow-1

bungalow

bungalowaloe, callow, fallow, hallow, mallow, marshmallow, sallow, shallow, tallow •Pablo, tableau •cashflow • Anglo • matelot •Carlo, Harlow, Marlowe •Bargello, bellow, bordello, cello, Donatello, fellow, jello, martello, mellow, morello, niello, Novello, Pirandello, Portobello, Punchinello, Uccello, violoncello, yellow •pueblo • bedfellow • playfellow •Oddfellow • Longfellow •schoolfellow • Robin Goodfellow •airflow • halo • Day-Glo •filo, kilo •armadillo, billow, cigarillo, Murillo, Negrillo, peccadillo, pillow, tamarillo, Utrillo, willow •inflow • Wicklow • furbelow • Angelo •pomelo • uniflow •kyloe, lilo, milo, silo •Apollo, follow, hollow, Rollo, swallow, wallow •Oslo • São Paulo • outflow •bolo, criollo, polo, solo, tombolo •rouleau • regulo • modulo • mudflow •diabolo • bibelot • pedalo • underflow •buffalo •brigalow, gigolo •bungalow •Michelangelo, tangelo •piccolo • tremolo • alpenglow • tupelo •contraflow • afterglow • overflow •furlough • workflow

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"bungalow." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 May. 2017 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"bungalow." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 25, 2017). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bungalow

"bungalow." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved May 25, 2017 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/bungalow